miker

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About miker

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  1. So my '06 CDI was running a bit rough on start up on cold mornings and I thought I'd order in a code reader off Amazon (with bluetooth so my phone could talk to it). It came up with P0302 code - misfire on cylinder 2. I looked around a bit and read someone suggest Seafoam. The next day I was in Canadian Tire with the wife (there was some big sale on) and hey, there's a stack of Seafoam right there. I picked up a can and over the course of the next couple of weeks fed it into the tank and guess what? The engine started purring again and no more 0302 fault codes. Hopefully using this additive moderately regularly will prevent further issues, but I figured I'd post here on the forum that knows everything about the Smart Car in case I'm missing something. I guess in the Summer I'd better finally figure out how to remove and clean the EGR valve. I should probably order those tools for the belts as well for the next time I have to change em. Just did the alternator belt and it was way harder than any other car I've worked on. Flat head screw driver had to get the job done instead of the easy green tools this time.
  2. GMC28: Sorry, don't have it. Call them, though and they'll find it for you. Francesco: Have them and used em. Unfortunately, I just have basic air tools so no getting in to tight spaces with them. Tolsen: Excellent point regarding reversing the bolts.
  3. Which for me is a pretty big thing - never done it before. The instructions on fq101.co.uk were very good and allowed me to pick up some external torx sockets (didn't even know such a thing existed before this job). E14 and E18 are required in addition to T30 and T40. Most of it went swimmingly, but a few points along the way had me cursing quietly under the car: removing the dust cover. I'm not sure if it's supposed to be this way, but I had to beat the hell out of it with a screw driver to be able to pry it out. prying the wishbone away to start removing the ball joint took more work than I thought, as was beating the threaded end of the ball joint to pop it out of the wishbone. getting the new ball joint aligned so could bolt it back in place. Other than those points, it was fairly straight forward. It was easier to torque up the 19 mm nut on the ball joint after jacking up the car by the wishbone. I guess it bound the threaded end somehow so it wouldn't just spin the ball in the socket. I thought it odd that the instructions wanted a specific torque, but then proceeded to show you how to tighten with a wrench while holding the bolt from spinning with a 4mm allen key. After going for a test drive it's apparent that the clunk that had been happening when going over uneven pavement and potholes was gone, but there's still a bit of a clunk if I take the gas off and coast and then hit the gas. Reference: http://www.fq101.co.uk/how-to-guides/fortwo-450/exterior/502-ball-joint.html edit to add: I picked up ball joints from NAPA locally. Took them 2 days to get them in, charged 46.88 + tax for their "premium" ball joint. They have a cheaper one as well. Was cheaper than ordering online if you count shipping costs. My wife was quoted 300-400 a side to have new ball joints installed from several local shops. Parts were billed at ~$150.00.
  4. Almost 2 years since my SAM saga was resolved, and everything is still ticking along nicely. Looking forward to your update, Alex.
  5. I am fairly new to my diesel and thought it was just a quirk of the car that the fuel gauge wouldn't show full until the second start! So it's actually the fuel, well who knew? There are only 4 or 5 places in town that I can get diesel and of them, I seem to get the best mileage from Shell, although I haven't had enough data points to really make up my mind. I guess I better get some fuel conditioner to fix that sticky fuel sender.
  6. Welcome, fellow BCer. You'll find this is THE place to get information on your new little car. Members here have made my life a lot easier with the free sharing of information.
  7. This.Put the key in and turn it so the accessories turn on. You should hear a humming noise behind you as the low pressure fuel pump comes on. If you don't, then either the pump's gone or the wiring harness to it from the SAM are likely bad. It's an easy test to rule this issue out.
  8. Thanks both of you. I'd measured it and figured it must be metric and got 26-28mm range. Typical 'technicians' must have done the last oil change as it's on there HARD. I've got air tools, but no 27mm socket. I'll pick one up tomorrow. In the meantime, I've put oil in and will use it for a week or two just to flush the system a bit.If anyone is interested, I used a little hand pump from Lordco designed for removing brake fluid and such. I had to use two sizes of tubing to downsize it correctly to fit the dip stick tube. It takes a fair bit of effort and you have to fill it about 5 times, but it gets the job done. Despite being listed as about $80 on the shelf, by the time it goes through the computer it comes out as $27.00
  9. Ok, I looked in the HOWTO's and saw the thread on oil changes by Shung (most of the images are missing now, though). I've sucked all the oil out of my car and am ready to pull the oil filter off. I've found what I think is the cover for the paper filter (under the motor at the rear, slightly to the passenger side). It is bell shaped with a bit approx. 1 inch hex nut end on it. I've tried getting this off, but it won't budge. I swear I'm putting close to 200 ft-lbs on it and it doesn't move. I thought I'd ask the experts. a) is this the oil filter cover? how the heck do you get it off??? The thing I'm turning looks exactly like the thing the guy in this thread http://forums.midnightruns.com/showthread....r-CDI-Oilchange identifies at the filter. Thanks, Mike
  10. Francesco hit the nail on the head. Now that I have this car up and running properly, I'm reading through the manual so I'll know all these basic facts in the future.
  11. Hopefully this is nearly the last time I need to post in this thread. I put a new wire in the SAM, carefully bent it around any pins on the pcb and out the hole I'd drilled in the SAM case. Then I reinstalled it back in the car and hooked up the battery. Blissful silence ensued. Encouraged, I proceeded to start the little car and it went almost flawlessly. Motor ran, fuel flowed and everything was perfect. Until I looked at the dash and saw my car now had -2km on the odometer and twin wrenches flashing (which I assume and will now look up in the manual to see if it means 'needs servicing'). I hope I can get the odo back reading properly, but if that's the only permanent problem, so be it. Tomorrow I'll finish up and get everything tucked away properly.
  12. I've attached a pic of what my fuses are looking like. I moved the purplish fuse holder to a switched socket but no change in behaviour. In the process of pulling the SAM so I can open it up and check the internals to see if there's a rogue blob of solder or some other malevolent being in need of removal. My Hallowe'en SAM exorcism I suppose. Sorry for the blurry picture, not much room to play with the camera under there and the carport it's in is tight quarters to begin with. I'm almost tempted to pull the seat out.update: I have the SAM apart and found that the wire I ran out through it got pinched on top of several pins on the PCB. At least two of them pierced the wire so I'm thinking one of them must be on an unswitched circuit. Redoing the wiring/solder job now. Oh how I wish old school electronics shops still existed around here so I could get someone competent to do this part
  13. And then there are hacks like me who blunder along and hope to learn something each time out =)
  14. [Thanks, Canman. That's quite illuminating and is another thing for me to check. I had the SAM removed at a local shop and they've reinstalled it. My plan is to drive it home tonight and then fix everything myself once back in my carport. I doubt the 'technician' (what's wrong with the word 'mechanic'?) took pictures before unplugging the fuses, so I'll have to figure out where they go myself somehow.
  15. [Thanks for the responses, MikeT and Alex.I'm pretty darned sure I got pin 10, having counted 10 pins from one side and three pins from the other. I also did continuity checks with an ohm meter to make sure I had a connection between just pin 10 and not any adjacent pins. That said, possibly a piece of loose solder has shorted the connections between 10 and 11. Does unswitched mean it runs straight off the battery and doesn't require the key in the car? If so, that would have to be the problem.