chriswh86

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About chriswh86

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    Vancouver Island, Canada
  1. Ahh yah, here it was tough for me to find the exact one. But i was able to find measurements and one that was similar in the Volvo.
  2. @Willys @stickman007 Are you both going to be running de-coupling pulleys and what vehicles did you find them on? I wish I had of timed the up-shifts before swapping.
  3. So when I purchased my used 06 Smart Fortwo it drove great around town. The first trip out of town I took i started to have what seemed like a random stalling issue. It always allowed me to restart after about 30 seconds when you could hear the Sam unit reset. I drove the car like this for a couple months trying to figure out exactly how I could replicate the stalling issue. While I wasnt able to figure out exactly what was causing it, I was able to read a code P0087 which was a low pressure fuel pump issue. I wasn't going to start randomly swapping out parts and knowing that the sam unit is a common problem, that was the first thing for me to check out. I also found paperwork in the car after cleaning it out and it turns out the previous owner was having stalling issues as well and had dumped nearly 1000 canadian loonies to multiple automotive shops to try to find the problem. Here is the SAM unit pulled out and on the table for disassembly. Opening it up like a book to get into the pins on the back of the boards. My first stop on the back of the board was the 11-3 plug. As show in the photo below, you will notice the straight line of 12 solder points. This is the back side of the 11-3 plug. Do you notice anything wrong? The right 3 pins appear to have actually broken and separated from the board. I took to re-soldering these 3 pins and other ones of concern around them. After re-assembly, the car is running great with no issues and any speeds! To re-cap my issues and to hopefully help other folks: My car would drive fine for what appeared to be any distances at or under 50km/h. I had one stall out of 50 under that speed. When I would drive above 50km/h it would seem I could drive for random distances, some days all the way home but typically it would stall on me. I was starting to think cold days were better and I could drive further or all the way home without issue. Hot days seemed to trigger the stalling issue more frequently. After stalling if possible i tried to drive slow and that usually helped. I started to tap the sam unit when driving was good and only once did I tap the SAM unit and the car stalled at the same time. I wasnt able to replicate it again but I think the first time I tapped the unit and it stalled i must have hit the 11-3 plug. Now looking at what the issue was and the symptoms I was having I am assuming that driving faster created more heat in the SAM unit and eventually lead to the pins disengaging from the board and the car would stall. I dont think vibrations caused the stall but it is possible. Either way, if you are having stalling issues have a look at your SAM. I am happy to dig into a SAM unit for you as well Chris,
  4. Well, my Fortwo suffered from the dreaded alternator belt slip since I purchased it. I couldnt wait long listenening to it every time id fire the car up. I learnt early that a new pulley was tough to find and usually resulted in purchasing a new alternator. Really not practical when one small component needed to be swapped. I was tempted to make a new pulley on the Lathe but opted for a quicker alternative. I did some searching and came across a post made by @tolsen on the use of a decoupling pulley. I wasn't able to find the exact pulley used but after some more researching I was able to source a pulley from a 2000 Volvo S70 2.3L L5 Turbo. Below is the stock pulley As you can see, the aluminum pulley is showing horrible signs of wear. Each tip has multiple grooves in it. I do like that its lightweight but its not made to last a long time and should be a readily available part at a good price but it is not. And the new Volvo de-coupling pulley beside the old setup. You will notice the new pulley is a lot more involved. In simplest terms the pulley will engage/lock when on the throttle and the belt speed is higher than the current rpm of the alternator pulley. As soon as the belt speed decreases below the pulley rpms the pulley begins to free-wheel. This decreases load on the belt and, in turn, the engine and apparently it will reduce up-shift time. I did not time the upshifts before fixing the pulley but it might have increased slightly. As noticed above the pulley wasn't a perfect fit out of the box. For one, its a 6 rib belt, not a huge deal as you can pick either the top 5 ribs or the bottom 5 ribs to use your belt on. The main concern is that none of the ribs lined up. I was able to easily press the inner race and shift it slightly to align the ribs perfectly. Much better alignment. The photo shows it being off but from my measurements at the time it was perfect. Beautiful new pulley installed and ready to go. I was lucky to grab this pulley off RockAuto for only 50 bucks Canadian! You'll notice it comes with a top cap or outer cap, this is to help protect the bearing. And finally installed back in the car. I've been running this setup for a good few weeks now without issue. The belt is running great. Very happy with the results and the price of the pulley. Has anyone else ran a de-coupling pulley?