smartdriver

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About smartdriver

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    Toronto, Canada

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  1. I had originally posted this in another older thread, but it did not appear on the front page. For this reason I had to start a new thread. Yesterday, I took my 2005 Cabriolet with 75,000 km on it on the highway for the first time in a long time. After parking the car, when I restarted it, I noticed a check engine light.. A scangauge check revealed P0380 which indicates a glow plug problem. I couldn't clear the code with the scangauge. When I started the car today (no problem starting) , the check engine light came on and the glow plug light stayed on for over a minute, but then the glow plug light went out leaving only the check engine light on. After reading this thread I was convinced that I needed new glow plugs. Later on in the day, I started the car, drove 30 km and when I restarted the car again both the glow plug light and the check engine light were off and everything was behaving normally. I was hoping that someone who had experienced a P0380 problem could comment on the possible reasons that a code such as this can possibly fix itself.
  2. Yesterday, I took my 2005 Cabriolet with 75,000 km on it on the highway for the first time in a long time yesterday. After parking the car, when I restarted it, I noticed a heck engine light.. A scangauge check revealed P0380 which indicates a glow plug problem. I couldn't clear the code with the scangauge. When I started the car today (no problem starting) , the check engine light came on and the glow plug light stayed on for over a minute, but then the glow plug light went out leaving only the check engine light on. After reading this thread I was convinced that I needed new glow plugs. Later on in the day, I started the car, drove 30 km and when I restarted the car again both the glow plug light and the check engine light were off and everything was behaving normally. I was hoping that someone who had experienced a P0380 problem could comment on the possible reasons that a code such as this can possibly fix itself.
  3. I am somewhat surprised at the negativity associated with preparing to use a gasoline generator to charge an electric car in emergencies. For myself, if I had only an electric car, it seems to make a lot of sense as well as it does to the huge number (over 46,000 reads) on this Leaf thread on the subject. http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=5792
  4. You are lucky that you don't live in Houston, Florida or Puerto Rico. Even Toronto and the East coast of the U.S had long power outages in 2003 and a few Winter storms that did the same.
  5. Because it would be a simple solution if there were ever a possibility of being stranded. The cost of a small portable generator is likely close to the cost of a tow. If you check the Leaf and I-miEV forums, there are a number of large technical threads on the subject of using portable gasoline generators as chargers. There appear to be a lot of immoral electric car drivers out there.
  6. Isn't this requirement only necessary when the generator is used permanently connected and used as a backup in home systems so that ground faults are properly detected?
  7. But my point was that this error can be overridden by simply connecting the generator neutral to generator ground (chassis) which some do with an external adapter or as in the case of the Generac generator seen in the video, there is a switch to make this connection.
  8. Thank you for the video link. It clearly indicates that a gasoline generator may be used if the neutral and common are joined and not what the following previous response describes. On 6/14/2016 at 9:14 AM, steveyfrac said: You would need to carry a large mallet and a copper grounding rod as well. You cannot charge any EV with a normal generator, unless you properly ground it. I tried it, just to be sure. The car checks the ground, by intentionally leaking current to ground, and making sure that the ground voltage doesn't change. A little generator wont (and can't) pass this test. So, you'll plug it in, and the car will refuse to charge unless you pound a grounding rod into the ground, and wire it up correctly to your generator.
  9. This is an older thread. I am presenting it and referring to the video link below to correct some of the misinformation in this thread that was presented in response to my question about using a gasoline generator as an emergency generator for charging. "You would need to carry a large mallet and a copper grounding rod as well. You cannot charge any EV with a normal generator, unless you properly ground it. I tried it, just to be sure. The car checks the ground, by intentionally leaking current to ground, and making sure that the ground voltage doesn't change. A little generator wont (and can't) pass this test. So, you'll plug it in, and the car will refuse to charge unless you pound a grounding rod into the ground, and wire it up correctly to your generator."
  10. Some time ago when considering an electric car, I was curious about the cost of using an emergency backup gasoline generator to charge the car. Taking into account the efficiencies, my calculation resulted in an equivalent mileage of about 25 miles per gallon, not much different than a typical internal combustion car if it became necessary to use the gasoline generator in case of a power outage. When I posted this it was brought to my attention that this wouldn't work unless the gasoline generator was physically grounded with a grounding rod connected to its chassis and actually driven into the ground. Although I understand the safety reasoning for doing this, I found it difficult to understand how the electronics could sense that the charger (in this case the gas generator) had been physically grounded. My question is this. Would not the same result have been achieved by connecting the neutral output of the generator to the chassis (ground lead) of the generator? I was hoping that anyone with more experience in this matter could comment.
  11. Changing the headlight bulbs is not fun in any way that it is done, but the link below shows how to do it through the front small panels. https://www.evilution.co.uk/295
  12. Your symptom sounds like the wastegate is sticking or misadjusted. The rear body panels come off with 7 Torx screws. The problem is that the front lower screws are sometimes difficult to remove because of corrosion. Usually the wastegate arm just needs high temperature lubrication.
  13. Not Pin 33. Key Position 2 is on Pin 38. Checking the voltage on Pin 38 of the cable harness will only indicate that you have a good key switch. Pin 38 is an input from the key switch to the SAM and will not confirm that there is water damage in the SAM or a corroded starter solenoid connection. The SAM output to the starter solenoid is on connector N11-6 Pin 1. Measuring the voltage there when starting the car would determine if the SAM is OK or if it is starter related.