smartdriver

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Everything posted by smartdriver

  1. I had originally posted this in another older thread, but it did not appear on the front page. For this reason I had to start a new thread. Yesterday, I took my 2005 Cabriolet with 75,000 km on it on the highway for the first time in a long time. After parking the car, when I restarted it, I noticed a check engine light.. A scangauge check revealed P0380 which indicates a glow plug problem. I couldn't clear the code with the scangauge. When I started the car today (no problem starting) , the check engine light came on and the glow plug light stayed on for over a minute, but then the glow plug light went out leaving only the check engine light on. After reading this thread I was convinced that I needed new glow plugs. Later on in the day, I started the car, drove 30 km and when I restarted the car again both the glow plug light and the check engine light were off and everything was behaving normally. I was hoping that someone who had experienced a P0380 problem could comment on the possible reasons that a code such as this can possibly fix itself.
  2. Thanks for the reply, good thought, but after starting the car on numerous occasions, the problem has not recurred. One thought that I had was that the glow plugs draw large amounts of current which the ECU likely senses to determine if one or more plugs have failed. A possibility exists that there could be corrosion on the glow plug connector or a marginal ground from the glow plug driver.
  3. Yesterday, I took my 2005 Cabriolet with 75,000 km on it on the highway for the first time in a long time yesterday. After parking the car, when I restarted it, I noticed a heck engine light.. A scangauge check revealed P0380 which indicates a glow plug problem. I couldn't clear the code with the scangauge. When I started the car today (no problem starting) , the check engine light came on and the glow plug light stayed on for over a minute, but then the glow plug light went out leaving only the check engine light on. After reading this thread I was convinced that I needed new glow plugs. Later on in the day, I started the car, drove 30 km and when I restarted the car again both the glow plug light and the check engine light were off and everything was behaving normally. I was hoping that someone who had experienced a P0380 problem could comment on the possible reasons that a code such as this can possibly fix itself.
  4. I am somewhat surprised at the negativity associated with preparing to use a gasoline generator to charge an electric car in emergencies. For myself, if I had only an electric car, it seems to make a lot of sense as well as it does to the huge number (over 46,000 reads) on this Leaf thread on the subject. http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=5792
  5. You are lucky that you don't live in Houston, Florida or Puerto Rico. Even Toronto and the East coast of the U.S had long power outages in 2003 and a few Winter storms that did the same.
  6. Because it would be a simple solution if there were ever a possibility of being stranded. The cost of a small portable generator is likely close to the cost of a tow. If you check the Leaf and I-miEV forums, there are a number of large technical threads on the subject of using portable gasoline generators as chargers. There appear to be a lot of immoral electric car drivers out there.
  7. Isn't this requirement only necessary when the generator is used permanently connected and used as a backup in home systems so that ground faults are properly detected?
  8. But my point was that this error can be overridden by simply connecting the generator neutral to generator ground (chassis) which some do with an external adapter or as in the case of the Generac generator seen in the video, there is a switch to make this connection.
  9. Thank you for the video link. It clearly indicates that a gasoline generator may be used if the neutral and common are joined and not what the following previous response describes. On 6/14/2016 at 9:14 AM, steveyfrac said: You would need to carry a large mallet and a copper grounding rod as well. You cannot charge any EV with a normal generator, unless you properly ground it. I tried it, just to be sure. The car checks the ground, by intentionally leaking current to ground, and making sure that the ground voltage doesn't change. A little generator wont (and can't) pass this test. So, you'll plug it in, and the car will refuse to charge unless you pound a grounding rod into the ground, and wire it up correctly to your generator.
  10. Some time ago when considering an electric car, I was curious about the cost of using an emergency backup gasoline generator to charge the car. Taking into account the efficiencies, my calculation resulted in an equivalent mileage of about 25 miles per gallon, not much different than a typical internal combustion car if it became necessary to use the gasoline generator in case of a power outage. When I posted this it was brought to my attention that this wouldn't work unless the gasoline generator was physically grounded with a grounding rod connected to its chassis and actually driven into the ground. Although I understand the safety reasoning for doing this, I found it difficult to understand how the electronics could sense that the charger (in this case the gas generator) had been physically grounded. My question is this. Would not the same result have been achieved by connecting the neutral output of the generator to the chassis (ground lead) of the generator? I was hoping that anyone with more experience in this matter could comment.
  11. This is an older thread. I am presenting it and referring to the video link below to correct some of the misinformation in this thread that was presented in response to my question about using a gasoline generator as an emergency generator for charging. "You would need to carry a large mallet and a copper grounding rod as well. You cannot charge any EV with a normal generator, unless you properly ground it. I tried it, just to be sure. The car checks the ground, by intentionally leaking current to ground, and making sure that the ground voltage doesn't change. A little generator wont (and can't) pass this test. So, you'll plug it in, and the car will refuse to charge unless you pound a grounding rod into the ground, and wire it up correctly to your generator."
  12. Changing the headlight bulbs is not fun in any way that it is done, but the link below shows how to do it through the front small panels. https://www.evilution.co.uk/295
  13. Your symptom sounds like the wastegate is sticking or misadjusted. The rear body panels come off with 7 Torx screws. The problem is that the front lower screws are sometimes difficult to remove because of corrosion. Usually the wastegate arm just needs high temperature lubrication.
  14. Not Pin 33. Key Position 2 is on Pin 38. Checking the voltage on Pin 38 of the cable harness will only indicate that you have a good key switch. Pin 38 is an input from the key switch to the SAM and will not confirm that there is water damage in the SAM or a corroded starter solenoid connection. The SAM output to the starter solenoid is on connector N11-6 Pin 1. Measuring the voltage there when starting the car would determine if the SAM is OK or if it is starter related.
  15. I'm certain that others with more experience will chime in, but it is my understanding that the solenoid has a push on connector which can get corroded. If this is NOT the problem, the car can likely be started with a STAR machine connected to the OBD2 port. The SAM also has a key switch position 2 input, which can be damaged by water intrusion and corrosion on the SAM connectors and printed circuit board. http://clubsmartcar.com/index.php?/topic/30960-2006-smart-car-wont-start/ http://clubsmartcar.com/index.php?/topic/30738-no-start-smart/#comment-348563
  16. It would be worthwhile checking this. I had a similar problem and it turned out that I had plugged one of the switched fused wires from the cable harness into an unswitched position.
  17. Doesn't a clamp on DC ammeter indicate whether the battery is charging or discharging and also indicate what the battery current drain is when the car is not running?
  18. Just curious why the problem as previously suggested cannot be diagnosed by measuring the battery voltage from the cigarette lighter or a clamp on DC ammeter on the battery brown wire negative terminal to ground?
  19. Three individuals Yuvi33, Silver and bothfeetin recently requested assistance to some unusual problems to which I and a number of others made some suggestions. I was hoping that they would respond with an update as the resolution of their problems might help others.
  20. I like Henry's suggestion. I have had 2 smarts with seized rear brakes from being outside in bad weather. Both recently had new rear brakes installed. The posted solution is a complicated technique involving removing a wheel. I found it much easier to get a long metal rod (I used a socket wrench extension), remove the hub cap if it has one, place one end of the rod between the wheel spokes against the rear brake drum on the drum surfaces where the brake pads are and hit the other end of the rod forcefully a few times with a rubber hammer. In both instances you could hear a bang as the brake pad released from the drum. The photo below shows the internal structure and the position of the pads. It is for this reason that I rarely use the emergency brake when parked outside for long periods of inactivity.
  21. Aha! Pin 9, a bad address line. Pin 9 is the most significant bit of the 3 bit address line which means that the chip was looking at only the sequence of inputs, 0, 1, 2 and 3 and not 4, 5, 6 and 7. The turn signals are looked at in sequence on inputs 5 and 6 and weren't being recognized. Congratulations. Nice work! You mentioned that you had replaced connectors N11-8 and 9. Amazing! On my car I had a corroded and broken pin on one of these connectors which meant that I had no horn. I was able to push an unused pin out of the connector and replace the corroded one. Thanks for reporting back. It's gratifying that the issues that I had with my car were to be of some help. For what it is worth, I cleaned all the dirt and debris under the rubber molding at the bottom of my windshield and applied a thin GE silicone windshield sealant. Even if the windshield isn't leaking, there is a possibility that condensation accumulates on the wiring harness and wicks down into the SAM. I also placed a sponge between bundles of the wiring harness above the SAM and sprayed the connector pins with a cleaning and lubricating agent such as DeoxIT. Four years later, parked outside, exposed every day to a Canadian environment and no problems.
  22. There have been threads on how to repair a SAM module affected by external water damage which affects the connectors. On my SAM, the damage was internal with corrosion eating away a number of traces. My main symptoms were no turn signals and a right turn signal which came on when the emergency brake was applied and no left air-conditioning light. The corrosion was from water ingress on connectors N11-8 and N11-9. My problems might have been compounded by overcharging on numerous occasions a sick battery which put sulfuric acid fumes in the car. When I took my SAM apart there was corrosion in two places on the board some of which I was able to fix with jumpers. This fixed the air-conditioning but didn't fix the turn signals. The worst damage was a corroded 74HC151 multiplex chip. This chip has 8 inputs and receives the signals from switches in the car (turn signals, wipers, emergency brake etc.) The computer scans the inputs one at a time and tells a relay whether to turn on or off. I replaced the chip. Still no turn signals. The fact that two things were happening at the same time for some switches indicated to me that some of the plated through holes on the circuit board had corroded which disconnected the input to the chip. Because this is a CMOS chip, an unconnected input could make the output go either way. It is for this reason that every input on the connectors is terminated with a resistor and capacitor. From information from EVILUTION and FQ101.CO.UK, I was able to determine which inputs were involved in my problems and was able to test with an Ohmmeter the input connections to the chips. These connections are shown in yellow and using an Ohmmeter should measure zero Ohms from end to end of each of the yellow lines. http://www.fq101.co.uk/images/450/electrical/SAM.pdf http://www.fq101.co.uk/how-to-guides/fortw...am-removal.html http://www.fq101.co.uk/how-to-guides/fortw...sam-wiring.html http://www.evilution.co.uk/index.php?id=721 On the picture of the topside of the board I have put yellow squares around the input lines and orange squares around the address lines. The input pins on the chips themselves may then be tested for continuity to ensure that the plated through holes are OK. All of mine were OK. There is another way that two items could be turned on at the same time. If the 3 address lines (Pins 9,10 and 11) were not properly connected, this also could cause a problem. Unfortunately the address lines go through plated through holes under the chips, so I had to remove it again. Sure enough, the plated through holes for the address lines which are under the chips were corroded and I had no idea where to connect them, but I got lucky. One of the lines was still connected and making contact with the address line of the other chip. This meant that I could connect the address lines of the two chips together above the board with jumpers. In the pictures below taken from the Evilution site I have shown in yellow many of the input connections. There should be continuity from end to end of each yellow line. This will confirm that the plated through hole along this path is OK. The address pins I have shown in orange. There are three and they are connected together pin to pin on each of the two chips.
  23. The left and right turn signal inputs go to Connector N11-9 Pins 38 and 39. Did you check the continuity shown in the blue lines on the photo below? The inputs then go to Pins 13 and 14 of the chip through plated-through holes on the board. It would be worthwhile checking to see if there is continuity directly to the pins of the chip from the top of the board to the bottom. I am concerned about this potential solution because there doesn't seem to be damage in that area. The fact that the turn signal lights flash with the key is a good sign, but it suggests that there is no input to the chip from the turn signal stalk. You stated that you originally had a permanently blinking left indicator. This is symptomatic of bad address lines and corroded plated-through hoes under the chips. Can you still confirm that Pins 9, 10 and 11 of each chip are connected to the same pins on the other chip? My turn signals didn't work because of corroded plated-through holes under the chips which I corrected with jumper wires on the top side of the board between Pins 9, 10 and 11 of each chip. I would also check to see that there is NO continuity between adjacent pins on the chip on the chance that two of them may be connected together in the soldering process. The damage on your board appears to be near Output and Enable pins 5, 6 and 7 of the chip. It would be worthwhile determining if there is continuity from these pins on the top side of the board to the bottom. One thing I would do first is to make sure that Pins 38 and 39 of the female connector at the end of the cable is also not corroded and that there is an input from the turn signal stalk on these pins. My connectors N11-8 and N11-9 had some badly corroded pins. I cleaned them with a product called DeoxIT. You have stated that you changed these connectors, but again it would be worthwhile checking corrosion on the female connector for N11-9 at the end of the cable harness. Good luck and please keep us apprised of your progress!