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Ok - what I meant was, if the egr valve is clogged anyway.... wouldn't the gunk that is clogging it have exactly the same effect as blocking it with a plate?-Iain

No. The plunger will try to move the diverter and won't be able to do that properly due to the gunk build-up, so the trouble code is induced. OTOH, the blocking plate allows full range-of-motion of the diverter so the ECU figures everything is normal.A personal note: having read up some more on the operation and function of the EGR system, I've decided not to attempt the blocking-plate solution on my engine. I think my driving style and the climate in my area, and the fact that I burn mostly biodiesel in summer and add Milligan's in winter (both of which enhance combustion and reduce carbon buildup), are sufficient to minimize EGR clogging. I've had no problem with this in my first 40,000km.HTHBil :sun:

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I've had no issue at 118,000 kms FWIW. I run on the highway lots, and do use occasional additives that are said to help with EGR issues and the like.IMO, EGR issues are more common in city driven diesels, and can also be climate sensitive.

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That would probably explain why mixed and I both have completely clogged ones - we live in Ontario. :)I think we have near identical driving patterns too.-Iain

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I'll have to check mine out. I asked M-B Oakville to look at it when my car was in for a B service today, and Melissa said they looked at it and said it was fine, but nothing was noted on the service invoice.

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And I bet that's all they did- look at it. Like all dealers they won't do something unless there is a check engine light on, or loss of function.To really check this you need to take the hose off and look at the bottom 1/3 of the unit. If the car has over 40,000 kms be prepared for a clean out.

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To really check this you need to take the hose off and look at the bottom 1/3 of the unit. If the car has over 40,000 kms be prepared for a clean out.

I'd better check mine soon. I'm not experiencing any loss of power though. Maybe I'll leave it till my next service.

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Well, until there's a loss of function and the computer throws up a code, there isn't a problem, no?I'll be keeping an eye on it and will make sure to take it in for a thorough once-over before the warranty expires, but i'm not one to start taking things apart and cleaning them unless there's a really good reason to.

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Putting air in the tires and oil in the engine is one thing, but disconnecting hoses and mucking about in the innards is not something i'm prepared to do until the car is out of warranty.

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not something i'm prepared to do until the car is out of warranty.

as most discussing this issue here already are......... others here just like to muck around

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I had my car in to the dealer today to replace both heated mirrors (neither of them have ever worked) on an open work order made before the car went off warranty :biglaugh: . Luckily for me there was also a standing order to check into the blocked EGR valve - so when they offered to replace it for me for free even though the car is coming up to 83,000 kilometres, of course I said "go for it." It was a five-hour wait, but what the hell.I talked to the tech about this and he said that almost every Smart that has gone through the dealer has had the EGR replaced. Yep - that's about a 100% failure rate, something I have long suspected. And he placed the blame solely on dirty fuel. I told him that I regularly did the "Italian tuneup" (thank you Bil - that is a great term and it fits perfectly with my Ferrari stickers!) so there is no reason for me to have a clogged EGR, and he replied that it is just bad fuel, plain and simple. He was pretty amazed, in fact, that I drove across the Rockies on this clogged EGR!Anyhow - I looked at the EGR that they took out, and it was really something else - it must have been at least 75% blocked. How the car managed to keep driving is beyond me. The crud in there was worse than the lungs of a lifetime smoker. I asked him about the oil in the intake after the air cleaner, and he said that I should just take that piece out and clean it - not hard to do. I also prodded him on the easiest way to take out the EGR myself and clean it (for the inevitable next time this happens - should be next summer) and he said just take the back off the car, take off the fan for the intercooler, and then it is relatively easy to get the assembly off. The three bolts we have talked about come off, and then there are a couple of torx bolts to come off, and the whole assembly just seems to pop right out. It looked simple enough with the car up on the stand and the backing off. It remains to be seen how easy it will be when I have to do it for myself in the comfort of my own garage...To make a long story short - I think the secret is to burn biodiesel if at all possible, use the Pennzoil cleaner at regular intervals, use Milligans or some other additive to keep the innards as clean as possible, and every once in a while just get out on the highway and let 'er rip for as long as possible. Pretty unscientific, all in all, but that's what I came away with from the conversation. Thoughts?

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I talked to the tech about this and he said that almost every Smart that has gone through the dealer has had the EGR replaced. Yep - that's about a 100% failure rate, something I have long suspected. And he placed the blame solely on dirty fuel.

Interesting! I was at the dealer today and talked to someone who is going to have the EGR valve replaced for the second time. It's starting to look like that tech is correct.

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Did you get to keep the EGR that they took off ??

Unfortunately, no, because it was fixed under warranty. The next time I'll just have to take it out and clean it myself.

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If someone decides to do a EGR removal clean and reinstall I truly hope they take lots of high def pics and post them in how too ?

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I just got back from my second trip to the eastern states (New York this time instead of Vermont). Both return trips I have done on the I-90 at 75-80 mph and I find that the car runs much better after one of these 4 hour runs at almost top speed.

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After a good hard run I have found the same thing. Last year on the way home from the Relay I added a slosh of cetane booster and chased a Mazda and an Accord home as best I could. It was almost as if the car was going thank C'rist, it's about time. :yahoo:

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http://www.whnet.com/4x4/smart_ev.html

Exhaust gas recirculation, catalytic converter and particle filter as standard

The three-cylinder diesel engine controls emissions in two stages. The high-tech common-rail injection and the extremely efficient combustion process inside the engine provide for a low level of untreated emissions. Depending on the driving situation and the engine load, up to 60 percent of the previously cooled exhaust gas is returned to the combustion chambers where it is combusted once again thus greatly reducing nitrogen oxide emissions. The exhaust gas recirculation works with an electropneumatic actuator which enables it to react quickly to changes. An oxidation catalytic converter and an open diesel particle filter are responsible for the aftertreatment of the exhaust gases. These are housed together with the exhaust silencer in a stainless steel case.

60% of the exhaust going towards the intake seems like an awful lot. No wonder these EGRs clog up so quick with soot buildup. Do the remaps on these cars also deactivate the EGR? Seems like a worthwhile mod.

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CDN cars do not have particle filters.

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That description for exhaust gas recirculation is for the new 45 HP diesel that was introduced with the 451 in Europe, thus the particulate filter.However the 60% exhaust gas recirculation number is probably correct for the Canadian cdi's.

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If some of the MB techs say it's dirty fuel clogging EGR valves, is the same problem happening in Europe with their better quality diesel to the same degree? What about the frequency of turbo replacements as well?

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Just had to get my EGR valve changed on my Mazda Protege 5. Bought on 2001 and with 107,000 km 2 years and 27 k kms beyond warranty. EGR was replaced with a new design part FoC and I had to pay $80 labour. That's pretty good in my book. Now will MB match that if we have problems after the warranty period is over?

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Just had to get my EGR valve changed on my Mazda Protege 5. Bought on 2001 and with 107,000 km 2 years and 27 k kms beyond warranty. EGR was replaced with a new design part FoC and I had to pay $80 labour. That's pretty good in my book. Now will MB match that if we have problems after the warranty period is over?

Did the Mazda people say much about the reason for the replacement? Did you have performance problems or was it a general recall?Bil :sun:

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We had our EGR replaced at 16000 km. It's been fine ever since (now 48000 k). I was told that this was a Canadian phenomenon because of the poor quality of our diesel (high sulphur).What I'm finding surprising reading this topic is that people are having repeat problems with their EGRs. I was told that the 2006 models had a bigger opening in the EGR that would not plug as easily, and ours was replaced with a 2006 spec. Are any of you that are having EGR issues driving a 2006 model?

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We had our EGR replaced at 16000 km. It's been fine ever since (now 48000 k). I was told that this was a Canadian phenomenon because of the poor quality of our diesel (high sulphur).

Methinks the fuel is the prime suspect as well. Starting June 1 2006, all on-road diesel was not to exceed 15 ppm of Sulphur at the point of production (i.e. the refinery gate) and at the point of importation, existing supplies in the distribution network may still have had Low Sulphur Diesel(LSD). . Anyone with a 2005 probably started filling with LSD(up to 500ppm) until ULSD became widely available. It would be interesting in anyone has had an EGR problem with a car delivered after June 2006.

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