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MikeT

My 404 Coupé Injection

266 posts in this topic

Nice to see this progressing closer and closer! My friend Dwayne nearly has his V4 Saab ready to be a daily driveable car! 68 I guess it is!

 

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I took the advantage of the current pause in work to clean the old door seals.  The new replicas available these days are too thick and press too hard against the doors when shut and because the rubber of the originals seems to be in decent condition, I thought I'd spend a few hours cleaning one up to see if my plan to reuse them would pay off....

 

Before:

Dirty-seal.jpg

 

Before (inside the seal where the metal clips are placed):

Inside-dirty-seal.jpg

 

After:

Cleaned-door-seal.jpg

 

After (inside the seal where the metal clips are placed):

Inside-cleaned-seal.jpg

 

Thanks to Jérôme Roussel in France for giving me 1.5 metres of metal clip strips, to replace the 1.5 metres of my originals that rusted to FeO2 powder in the 5 years these seals from 1975 were on the car, and the car on the road.  These will all be de-rusted and electroplated in Cadmium and painted, then reinserted into the seals.

Door-Seal-metal.jpg

 

As I noted, the seals were bought by the previous owner in 1975 at Jay's British and European Motors - I still have the invoice - and they were on this daily driven car for five years.  After that the car was in a garage and so the rubber is truly in excellent condition.  Three hours or maybe a bit more with Flitz polish turned them from a rusted, dirty mess into what appears to be nearly new and very soft and supple rubber!

 

After a good wash with a nail brush, the cleaned seal was treated with this Würth stuff and wow did it make a huge difference!

Rubber-treatment.jpg

 

The door-mounted striker plates are not as good looking as they should be so they too will be replated when the seal clips are done.

URL%5D

 

It seems that the spare connecting rod bolts I have are a bit too short so I'll be ordering a couple of sets from Europe shortly.

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New conrod bolts arrived this week.  In the fall - October - the block will come out of the car to get the last (I hope!) of this job done.

Connecting Rod Bolts.jpeg

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I also bought a rebuilt NOS Hydrovac brake booster from the USA Club 404 representative in Boston, on favourable terms.  It was rebuilt three years ago at White Post Restorations in Virginia.  This will replace the old, old NOS one that has never been rebuilt that is in the car and likely is no good anymore.  I may rebuild the one in the car sometime but not in the near future!

 

Rebuilt Hydrovac.jpeg

 

This will be done after the engine block is out again, so I can get the braking system verified properly before the reassembled engine goes back in!

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Engine's out again, to replace the rod bolts and put the replaned head on again in comfort on the engine stand.  My son is in the photos, helping out today.

IMG-8047.jpg 
IMG-8049.jpg
IMG-8050.jpg
IMG-8051.jpg
IMG-8052.jpg
IMG-8053.jpg

Edited by MikeT
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Just out of curiousity did you get the block checked for flatness...?  Was it machined at all?  Even to get rid of those marks it has which could be the cause also of any leakage...?  I personally wouldn't be using it this way unless it was impossible to loose another mm from the mating surfaces...?  I'd hate to have to remove it again but it wouldn't be something I haven't experienced before...lol.  I am finding things get messed up quickly when we take so long to get a job done compared to doing it in a timely fashion.  I have never taken so long to rebuild anything in my life as this car in garage is taking me to complete.....augh!   Just my bend nickel's worth....

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The iron block is true - checked with mechanic's straightedge, it is not machinable because the wet liners must protrude a certain amount, and it's perfectly fine in this condition.  I rebuilt one of these in 1987 which looked worse and it sealed perfectly.  The problem with coolant leakage was from the 0.38 mm low spot on the head, which was machined out recently.

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Good to know, just thought I would ask just to be nosey so to speak.....I have had the nasty situation with an old flat head 4 in a Jeep many million years ago.....it was a sharp learning curve.  I also get all high dollar engines magna-fluxed for cracks again from a bad experience.....augh!  Nothing worse than spending all your hard earned money on a head in my issue only to find out it leaked water into the combustion chamber.....

 

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This block was magnafluxed along with the crankshaft and forged rods.  All good to go.

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I finally got around to whipping the first piston out to do a conrod bolt swap and when I took it apart, the new bearing was scored and after having a close look at the big end journal, the culprit was a significant gouge on the freshly reground crank.  Good grief!

So the work was suspended (though I did change that rod's bolts) and the crank has to come out for at least a machine shop polish or maybe a regrind to 0.5 mm.  I'm glad I decided to take it apart because a gouge like this would probably lead to a rod knock after a while. 

I once had a Renault 12 with a knock (car cost $50) and when we changed the rod bearings, the big end of the knocking cylinder had been punched when the car was new at the factory.

I think I'll look for another place to do this second regrind....ugh

1442905129_scorednew0.3mmbearing.thumb.jpeg.a48ee702fa3fd293906c5c2343bafbc2.jpeg341306165_damgedcrank.thumb.jpeg.cba8c85090d173838a35dc19cebf3741.jpeg

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Who assembled the block....the shop or yourself? I have seen it where if you drop the connecting rod hard enough onto the bearing surface on the crank it can lead to this type of mark which will lead to this damage. Just a thought, you can blame who-ever did the long block assembly, maybe...?   This also can happen if when you tap the pistons into the bore and the connecting rod connects with the crank incorrectly ....again just a thought?
i personally would simply use some 3000 grit paper and carefully scuff the crank if you can see the bad spot, again IF it's not too bad....?

It's not like this engine will see hundreds of thousands of kms  imho.

 

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yeah work out the blip then polish it out with a strip of super fine crocus ...it isnt that bad and definitely not worth the trouble of taking it all apart and regrinding 

 

sheet happens

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It was assembled by the shop and the reason I took it apart was not to inspect their work but rather to replace the rod bolts, which I had forgotten to do.

 

I'll get it checked and polished professionally and if it stays at 0.3 mm undersized I'll get new bearings, as these ons are really gouged.  If it goes to 0.5 mm I have a new set of shells already in my stock.

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Engine is in bits again and at some point I will take it into a machine shop with instructions to clean up the mess the other shop made, even if it means taking the journals down to 0.5 mm from 0.3.

Crankshaft removed again.jpeg

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OK, seeing you have it out this far again, i would start as if a new project, triple checking everything required, such as blowing out all oil passage ways for machine filings etc etc. Just because of how the shop did the work they did in the first place. Just for peace of mind. Just because it's basically in bits, may as well.  Starting from step one so to speak. I'd also be checking every surface this shop touched?  Maybe it wasn't them who dented this crank maybe it was...I don't know, but the head work was done very poorly for a well known shop as you say it was...imho so someone didn't check it before it went together. imho.  It's only time and your time is free, so again I'd spend plenty of time checking everything.  OR you can simply repair what you see and be done with it.  IF so then i would simply sand down the imperfections and put it back together as is.  It will run perfectly fine for the time you will run it. Unless you do plan on very long adventuring in it..which i doubt...I may be wrong but I see this as a sunday afternoon type driving machine. Not a multi day vacation trip vehicle where you will be banging on long miles etc etc.  You decide....after all this work I know which I'd be doing...lol.  Getting the microscope out and looking very carefully at everything possible they could have buggered up.

 

Edited by Willys

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