Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
MikeT

My 404 Coupé Injection

190 posts in this topic

Front cylinders assembled:
Front-brake-cylinders.jpg
 
Autopsy on the old oil pump - trashed inside.  The new one is perfect but of a slightly different form.  I will have to use a later type oil strainer with it.
Oil-Pumps.jpg
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brakes mounted.
 
It seems I may have lost or at least misplaced the brass connections between the front brake hoses and the forward brake cylinder.  The hose can be screwed straight in but that's not correct. I'll find two of them somewhere.

Driver side front brake spring detail.jpg

RF wheel on.jpg

RF brake detail.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This arrived from Peugeot Classic in Sochaux Thursday morning.  I have another shipment of stuff from them arriving probably next week. 

Oil pump filter 2.jpg

Oil Pump filter new 1.jpg

 

Friday morning: I had to pay $82 to bail this new old stock camshaft out of the post office:

Coated in the usual preservative, looking good.

Camshaft new.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ordered some 0.5 mm oversized main bearings sent from Peugeot but they sent the wrong ones - three main bearing lead-Indium 404 Injection mains 0.3 mm oversized (visible in the photo).  So the correct ones have been sent today, and it seems they don't want the incorrect ones back.  Also in the shipment were the things in the photo.  New stainless steel instrument panel trim for when I eventually build the Jaeger sports instrument panel, plus a spare oil pressure sending unit.

 

In the bag are some original type small diameter hose clamps for the heater hoses.

 

I also got some English language owners manuals of cars I've had (404 C but with carb. engine) or wanted (504C). The latest bit (504 C owners manual, La Production Peugeot 1963 and a first edition 404 Cabriolet French language owners manual should be here soon.

 

I will work on extracting the sludge trap plugs from the crankshaft this weekend. Likely have to drill all 4 out.

 

A set of the missing brass banjo fittings for the front drums has been sent by a kind soul in France, a 404 Club member - free! I'll send him something as a thank you.

Sochaux parts.jpg

 
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also look for good-quality bearings in Rolek store. I got some items from them, they have a wide choice of products and the delivery is quite fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I scored a set of NOS bearings on eBay, no worries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if having removable brass sludge traps in a forged steel crankshaft is a common thing, but Peugeots had that for a long time, from the 1940s through the 1980s.  It's tempting not to remove the hex-headed brass plugs because they are staked in place and unstaking (reversing the damage to the thread is difficult and it's easy to damage the brass, in which case the plug will have to be drilled out.  I am using a Dremel to do the unstaking.  The first one I tried before the Dremel is now stuck.  This one worked better.

sludge in trap 1.jpg

You can see inside the trap, there is a medium grey deposit that looks as though it might be part of the casting is sludge, the consistency of slightly moist clay.  There is not a lot of oil passage left clear and a couple of the oiling points on the front centre and rear mains were partially blocked too.  Ao, if restoring a Peugeot engine if the XC or XM/XN series, don't skip this step!

I also got from Jean-Marc Faivre in France a free pair of the banjo fittings that my car has likely been missing for three years! Very generous!

front brake banjos from Jean-Marc.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the Peugeot 404 crankshaft sludge trap plugs are brass and have a large hex keyway. The threading into which they're screwed is staked, which damages the threads in one spot and so reversing that damage is required before they'll come out. I used a Dremel power tool with a dentist drill sized head to take the ridges off the threads by the staking.

 

The hex tool will work sometimes, allowing you to turn the thing all the way out, though it likely will be stiff as hell. In my case, this tool worked one in four times. The other three were immediately rounded.

 

So I took a different approach for those. I used a larger Dremel drill head to carve a small channel at each of the 6 corners of the hex depressions and then hammered a Torx-60 socket into place. Rammed it home!

 

Using this approach on the three jammed ones made removal easy.

 

I got a similar amount of sludge/paste out of all 4.

 

I find it interesting that the 2nd and 4th main bearings appear not to be pressure lubricated at all4-crank-plugs-with-t60-jpg.640754-crank-plugs-jpg.6407464076

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was wrong about the main bearings 2 and 4...it seems as though they were an afterthought following the 3 main bearing engine but they do indeed have pressured oiling from the block, just not internal canals inside the crankshaft.  Serves me right for spending too much time staring at the crankshaft yesterday!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got some teaser photos from the vapour blasting shop.  I'll take more photos when I get the parts back.  Looks good to me!

192443619_Vapourblastedparts1.jpg.2c51c5a12364583f75b80174b008d683.jpg1365577724_Vapourblastedparts2.jpg.16a8d8bb5dd2622a99412586d682955b.jpg

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked up the vapour blasted parts this afternoon and took a few more photos.  Very clean; the throttle body was disassembled by me for internal cleaning as well as the installation of new bearings.

 

Driving the old ones out was easy - remove two circlips on the shaft end, remove the throttle spring holder from the shaft after marking its position, unscrew the 4 staked screws on either side that hold the bearings, tap the shaft out with  brass drift, tap the bearings out with a perfectly sized brass drift (there is the smallest of shoulders available to do that).

 

After its cleaned up I reassembled it with the new bearings that you see in one of the photos.  The old ones were shot, damaged by road salt I presume.

Throttle body 2.jpg

Purflux 1.jpg

Throttle Body apart.jpg

Timing cover blasted.jpg

Intake system 1.jpg

 

And now the throttle body is reassembled.  The screws were staked at the factory because the distance between the two plates determines the clearance between the throttle body and the throttle plate.  The large round inserts assure the air seal.  I didn't stake the screws but I did put blue Loctite on them.  The plates are snug to the throttle body but the screws are not "tight" but just touching the chamfered recesses in the two plates.  Now that it is all together, the throttle action is magnificently smooth!

 

I also took the wrong fuel filter for blasting so the vapour blaster guy will do the "correct" one for free on Wednesday!  The inside of the filter bowl that he blasted has severe rust pitting and the "correct" one does not. 

Throttle plate partialy assembled.jpg

Throttle Body reassembled.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the coolant tube that was recently adapted for the Injection engine by having a new water branch welded on is going into the plating shop Monday with a whole bunch of other stuff:

  • throttle body parts (just little stuff)
  • another batch of fasteners - I hope, the last
  • trunk latch
  • crank pulley
  • other small bits and pieces
  • fuel injection pipes

Also, I removed the three oil gallery plugs from the engine block today in preparation for its hot tanking in the shop I'm taking it to on Monday.  They're brass and the square heads are a tiny bit smaller than a 1/4 inch drive.  So I took a lower quality 1/4 inch drive and filed it until it fit.  The first one on the rear of the block came out easily.  The second one I tried, on the front of the block by the cam, stripped immediately (the square hole was rounded).  The third one came out beautifully.

The front one that stripped was not all that much of a worry.  I got a T-55 socket and used a Dremel to turn the formerly square but now rounded hole into an approximation of a Torx.  I hammered the T-55 home and used a huge breaker 1/2 inch drive bar to turn it out.  No worries.546323173_T55onoilplug.thumb.jpg.245bf819e9d26359a7f30121fbd3cacb.jpg 

Here is the sole rear oil gallery plug that turned out beautifully with my "special tool":

697140225_5mmonoilgalleryplug.thumb.jpg.3eb145de64efc6d3326e681913c3cdf8.jpg

 

Also going to the machine shop tomorrow is the following:

  • new cylinder head - for fitting of hardened valve seats
  • new piston and liner kit, for cleaning off the preservative and mounting the new pistons to the rods, plus a hone of the liners
  • connecting rods so the small end bushings can be replaced with the new ones I have, and also hot tanked to clean the crud off them
  • crankshaft for assessment and grinding/polishing
  • NOS camshaft to clean the preservative off and check the clearances in the block (with the possibility of a line bore and bearing bush installation if required - I hope it's not)
  • 0.3 mm oversized rod bearing shells
  • 0.3 mm and 0.5 mm oversized main bearing shells
  • bearing caps and rocker arms and rocker shaft holders, for hot tanking and assessment of the rocker arms - new rocker shafts are supplied

Once all this is done we will be on the home stretch.  With the block ready, I can paint it and then start reassembly.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The stuff to be plated is at Victoria Plating and the engine bits that have to be (nearly all) are at Anderson's, which is where this photo was taken this afternoon.

The crankshaft will be balanced by itself first, then again successively with each accessory that is attached to it once all is done.

Anderson's Machine Shop Evan Jennings.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a call from Anderson Precision Engines in Saanichton BC today. They have cleaned and checked all the steel and iron 404 engine parts using a magnaflux machine. Good news: the crank is good, the block is good, rods are good.

Scope of work:
- regrind and polish crankshaft, install sludge traps, balance it
- replace valve seats and grind new valves to suit
- replace small end bushes and fit to wrist pins/pistons
- paint outside of engine block
- re-bush all 8 rocker arms and match to new rocker shafts, reface their valve contact surfaces
- clean preservative off the cylinder liners and new camshaft
- reface flywheel, balance it alone, then on the crankshaft and then with the pressure plate

All of this is going to lead to a significant bill, but well under $2K CAD with taxes, so not crazy high. They do reassembly too but I think at this point that I'll do that myself.

This shop does the engine work for Coachwerks and Rudi & Co. in the old days - so they're good. It'd be nice to get it all back before the end of 2020 and then the end of this 32 year project will be in sight!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 NOS intake valves are on their way from Britain. I realized a couple of weeks ago that I only had three new ones and so I decided to get a set of 4 so I have some spares. They should arrive in a week or so.

 

Meanwhile, this coming Monday the pressure plate, clutch disc, flywheel bolts, timing gear and the Woodruff keys from the crankshaft head down to Anderson's for the follow-up work. I'll run the intake valves down then I get them, because they have to be cut to match the new valve seats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

    Chatbox
    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More