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steveyfrac

Biodiesel General Discussion

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Hey guys,I'm hoping to amass some information here on biodiesel, both those arguing for and against. This is partly for my own benefit, and partly for the benefit of new members who may be curious. I'd like to see both those with arguments for and against it's useI'd like to start off with a few points.Biodiesel... a) has fewer particulate emissions, but higher NOx emissions. B) has higher lubricity (it's more oily), and will better protect your fuel pump from undue wear c) can cause problems in older vehicles, wherein in can actually dissolve old rubber seals and fuel lines d) is solvent to dinodiesel deposits, and can clog fuel filters, or worse, fuel injectors. This can be prevented with gradual increase in blend % of bio e) is solvent to dinodiesel deposits and will clean fuel lines, tanks, and injectors. f) can cause oil polymerization. I'm unsure if that can damage things... g) has a higher cetane number, and higher flash point, and is almost CO2 neutral.Any other thoughts? I've used biodiesel, and am debating going back to it.

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Use the search function. There are tons of threads on biodiesel, including THIS ONE with 52 posts.

I'm staying with B40 for the winter, along with a winter additive.

B :sun:

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I used commercial B100 derived from waste restaurant oil throughout most of the summer until I finally found a Shell station with V-Power Diesel not far away. I tried the VPD and have mostly stuck with it for now, but have done top-ups of the B100 in my driveway, usually around B10 to B20 (eg: yesterday I added 2.8 L B100 to an 18 L VPD fill). The difference in power and FE was rather stunning, but I don't feel good about my carbon footprint (relatively speaking, of course).I will likely keep splash-blending up to B20 all winter, then I may switch back to B100 in May.

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Use the search function. There are tons of threads on biodiesel, including THIS ONE with 52 posts.I'm staying with B40 for the winter, along with a winter additive.B :sun:

That thread has a massive eco-hippy "are we really saving the planet slant". I had already read it. I'm more interested in discussing biodiesel as a fuel and it's effects on our vehicles.

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Apparently B40 gives my smart an "upset tummy" Throws a code to do with fuel rail pressure. P0140? Can't recall for sure. Happened twice. Oh, and the engine shuts down. Minor detail!Hasn't happened since I went off bio and onto Milligans. Not conclusive, I know, but it doesn't shut off in the fast lane anymore so I'm ok with that.

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Apparently B40 gives my smart an "upset tummy" Throws a code to do with fuel rail pressure. P0140? Can't recall for sure. Happened twice. Oh, and the engine shuts down. Minor detail!Hasn't happened since I went off bio and onto Milligans. Not conclusive, I know, but it doesn't shut off in the fast lane anymore so I'm ok with that.

This is the first i've heard of problems with biodiesel and the smart. Please keep us up to date on this issue if it re-occours, or gets properly diagnosed and such.

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In the testimonial/for what it's worth category:A long-time member in Victoria ran his car on Columbia B5 (yes only 5% BD) and after about 3 or 4 tanks, the car's low pressure fuel pump died while the car was in an intersection. The dealer blamed it on the fuel but ultimately proved their good will by covering the $500 bill anyway. I used two tanks of that stuff too but won't again (no ill effects).

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My LP pump was replaced at only 4000 Kms, so I should be good for... oh, wait...

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Isn't Milligan's a concentrated form of Bio...

Indeed. It is a super-refined concentrate that, at a mix-rate of only 1:1,000 provides the lubricity and emissions benefits of running B30!Bil :sun:

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Indeed. It is a super-refined concentrate that, at a mix-rate of only 1:1,000 provides the lubricity and emissions benefits of running B30!I have well over 50,000km with bio~ at rates from 20 to 100% and zero problems with either fuel pump.Bil :sun:

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We started running B20 when our smart had less than 2K then we switched to B50 and haven't looked back. Of course it's all commercial grade and meets ASTM D6751-07b.I personally wouldn't use anything of a home produced variety...

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I used biodiesel from March to October in grades from B40 to B100 almost exclusively. About a tank every two weeks. No problems, quite the opposite actually.When I was using only biodiesel, I had started using an injector cleaner every 6 to 8 weeks because it seemed to clear up an issue that appeared to be a stuck open wastegate at high RPM on the highway.After starting to use bio, the problem has not recurred. Now that I am back on dino for the winter, it'll be interesting to see if it turns up again.Edit: I should note that with the exception of one tank of B100, all mine was purchased from Autogas.

Edited by Gent

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For my two bits...I've been running Cascadia B40 for the last few months (short, I admit) and the experience so far has been great. FE was reduced by less than 10% but oddly enough I gained a slightly wider power band in the process (the car is now more comfortable cruising at even lower RPMs than on dino-diesel.) The car also seems to run a bit quieter, though it is not as if I have measured it with any equipment that could verify that. It might be a little more "expensive" than dino-diesel, and it might be a little less "efficient" too, but I look at it this way...It's not about money, and even if it were it is barely more expensive to run this way. It is, however, cheaper in a far more important way: I might be getting 4.2 l/100Km now, but only 60% of that is from petroleum. As far as I'm concerned, running on bio allows me to achieve ~2.5 petroleum l/100Km. :D

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Speaking of money, I was talking to a biodiesel consortium guy on Saltspring. He was telling me that their cost for making and testing high quality bio-diesel was about 0.70 per litre. They charged $1.00 a litre (back when things were around $1.50 at the Dino pump on island).So this begs the question of why the bio everywhere is so much more costly. I'm not objecting to making money, recouping materials cost quickly and paying a decent wage to your staff, but c'mon.

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I know in the case of the local B100 refiner, his price is based almost totally upon the wholesale cost of his feedstock. The waste oil collectors know they are sitting on liquid gold, and as with anything else in waste collection there is... outside influence. They charge as much as they can get.

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In other words, Rock Machine and Hell's Angels are the legitimate businessmen? ;)

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This is the first i've heard of problems with biodiesel and the smart. Please keep us up to date on this issue if it re-occours, or gets properly diagnosed and such.

B40 in very cold temps? Not a good idea.I've run B100 with no issues, but have had issues in the colder with B50.

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B40 in very cold temps? Not a good idea.I've run B100 with no issues, but have had issues in the colder with B50.

DOH! Never even occurred to me that cold would be an issue. I'm using Shell V-Power at the moment for the same reason. Biodiesel gels at a much warmer temperature then dino. Could have plugged the filter, and caused fuel starvation and the stalling issue that was mentioned. Truck Town Terminals in milton only runs B20 and it has a healthy dose of winter fuel additives. I don't like the sound of Stein on dino-diesel compared to bio. He sounds so much more grumpy in the morning.

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Isn't this just friggin' typical of the BC Government...http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/...ption-ends.html

Plus ca change, my friend, plus ca change.My local biodiesel outlet - the only one anywhere around here - quit selling biodiesel blends about one week ago.Time to pull my last case of Milligan's out of storage.Bil :sun: Edited by bilgladstone

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Is Gordo green? LOL

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Just heard back from Duane Searle from United Petroleum who is quoted in the CBC article..."I have put a complaint into the CBC about their inaccurate reporting. They asked if we were going to pull bio and I told them that it would be business as usual other than there will be a higher cost. I found 3 things that were inaccurate just in the portion that pertained to me and even the percentage of bio that is mandated is incorrect. They were telling me it was 3 percent and I corrected them 3 times in the interview that it is a 5 percent average. At any rate we have spent the money on the infrastructure why not use it."

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Is biodiesel dead?BC Government and other jurisdictions have rescinded tax exemptions and production subsidies. Autogas Kelowna has quit selling it. Bulk suppliers may go out of business. Report is that B100 will cost up to 50cts more per litre.... an idea whose time has come and gone?B :senile:

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The reason subsidies have been rescinded is that 5% biodiesel in now required in all diesel fuel supplies in the province.To my knowledge Chevron is the only major supplier that has complied this far...Implement a five per cent average renewable fuel standard for diesel by 2010 to helpreduce emissions and advance the domestic renewable fuel industry.In Spring 2006, the federal government announced its intention to proceed with a two percentnational average renewable fuel standard (RFS) in Canada’s diesel fuel no later than 2012. BritishColumbia will move beyond the federal RFS by adopting a five per cent biodiesel requirement inprovincial diesel fuel supplies by 2010.

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