Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
bilgladstone

Upgrade suspension bushings

43 posts in this topic

Imprecise handling? Uneven tyre wear? Braking instability?

These are the common problems associated with soft, ageing, or failing rubber compound suspension bushes. POWERFLEX products offer the cure.

No special tools are needed, and applications (that are constantly being added to) are available on a wide range of new and older popular models. Have a look at our FAQs to find out more.

Our bushes offer:

[*]Prolonged tyre life

[*]Improved performance

[*]Increase safety

[*]Greater cost-effectiveness

post-95-1230008852_thumb.gif

North American price list:

[*]$179.99 PFF68-101 Front Wishbone Bush

[*]$ 67.99 PFF68-104-21 Front Anti Roll Bar Bush 21mm (note: not sure if 21mm size or 18.5mm is correct)

[*]$ 67.99 PFR68-109-13 Rear Antiroll Bar Bush

[*]$ 89.99 PFR68-107 Rear Link Arm to Hub Bush (Outer)

[*]$ 84.99 PFR68-108 Rear Link Arm Bush (Inner)

Available through

Kyle Cooper

http://www.powerflexusa.com

877.639.9648

He has to bring them from Powerflex UK, so give him advanced warning if you want them.

Bil :sun:

Edited by bilgladstone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

$180 for one bushing? Fantasy pricing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No... I believe the line price is for the required set (4pcs in the case of the PFF68-101, 2ea of the others)Full replacement set is ~ $500.B :sun:

Edited by bilgladstone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even so, they had better be really good! OEM ones are probably about $10 each. My Peugeot ones are anyway and they last two decades in Africa ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are upgraded material and quality... not everyone will be convinced :dunno: ...from the Powerflex website:

If POWERFLEX products are this good why do car manufacturers use rubber and not polyurethane?

Cost, availability and marketing. Polyurethane, as a raw material is about ten times the cost of rubber plus it is more expensive and slower to process. Car manufacturers buy a lot of components. If Ford decided to use polyurethane bushes in their range of cars they would need to find a supplier capable of making literally millions of bushes a year. There is no company in the world (even EPTG Ltd) who could make those sort of quantities. Cars are all about marketing. As long as the standard rubber bushes work without serious failure for two or three years then the manufacturer is happy. Would fitting of polyurethane bushes make you buy one car in preference to another make? Probably not.

Why do I need them then?

POWERFLEX bushes improve your cars' road holding and chassis performance by controlling the amount of unwanted flex in the suspension. This means your suspension is doing what it is supposed to. It means your tyres have greater contact with the road at all times therefore improving safety and performance. Correctly formulated polyurethane is as good if not better at noise, vibration and harshness suppression when compared to rubber.

I only have a fairly basic saloon, why do need high performance bushes?

For exactly the same reason as above but with a different emphasis. If your tyres are in better contact with the road and your suspension movements are being controlled more accurately then tyre wear will be dramatically reduced. We have letters of recommendation from customers who state that they have doubled the life of their tyres on certain cars after fitting POWERFLEX bushes. We are not claiming that you will get this but worn bushes are dangerous and will be costing you money due to premature tyre wear. Have you ever taken your car into a tyre shop with tyres which are worn out on the inner or outer edges but perfectly legal everywhere else? You assume the tracking is wrong, but when the shop checks, it is correct. This is bush wear. When the car is stationary the tracking is correct but as you move and the loads increase then the tracking goes out. Come to a stop and the tracking is right again. Worn bushes.

Edited by bilgladstone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be careful of putting urethane in the smart - our suspensions are designed with the amount of compression etc. of the bushings taken into consideration for proper handling - especially with the Dion tube in the back - the MB guys are no slouches in the details department (not like the big 3 - use the same bushing in everything from a sports model to a pickup truck). Also urethane can give a pretty harsh ride - okay for a race car or off road racer - but not so good for a car that has pretty stiff ride to start with. Can actually hurt handling as the suspension becomes less compliant (factoid - most off road built 4x4's and racers go for really long soft springs and softer bushings to keep parts from tearing off).Cheers,Cameron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that I'll be doing this myself - but I know the subject has come up in the past and I wanted to post what I discovered by accident yesterday. In case anyone out there *cough* Eddy *cough, cough* might be interested in what's available for the smart off-the-shelf...

Also, I'm sure the MB guys know there stuff regarding H7 lights too, but that shouldn't hold anyone back from putting better lights in the car. Or better brake pads, or better tires, braided brake lines, etc., etc. Just more choices......

B :sun:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be careful with urethane in the suspension. It wears EXTREMELY fast compared to stock rubber bushings. Especially on the street when subjected to dirt and grit. The dirt gets in between the bushing material and the metal and acts like sandpaper.The stock rubber bushings are bonded to the metal shells and they are press fits. With a stock bushing there is no actuall sliding of the bushing material on the sleaves or bolts. All of the flex comes from the actual flexing of the rubber. Urethane works the opposite way, it actually slides back and forth on the bolt and housing to allow flex, this is why you have to lube them with silicone grease to prevent noise. It is this slidding back and forth that wears them out quickly.

Edited by MightyMouseTech

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with MightyMouseTech... these bushings are not for a daily driver. Remember they were all the rage for Honda's back in the day... a lot of people switched back to the stockers. Maintaining the urethane was a PITA and the ride is harsh too.Not to say that I wouldn't one day try them out ;)!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I even swapped them out of the racecar for these reasons. Went back to stock bushings (well, Mugen actually, which are the same design as stock, just a little stiffer). Now I have switched to spherical bearings however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again, we note what a wonderful, knowledge-sharing forum this is! Thanks everyone!!!B :sun:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also had these urathane bushings on my mazda, and yes Mighty Mouse your sure right about the noise, I was always underneath trying to grease them all.

post-3704-1230079207_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also had these urathane bushings on my mazda, and yes Mighty Mouse your sure right about the noise, I was always underneath trying to grease them all.

Jeez, brotha'... that looks like a real fun lil go-box! :o Edited by bilgladstone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also had these urathane bushings on my mazda, and yes Mighty Mouse your sure right about the noise, I was always underneath trying to grease them all.

Sweet looking car, is it an RX2 or 3? Looks like a nice clean build.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeeze, the mounties must've detailed one guy just to follow you around in that. What colour was that? Arrest-me red?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a 1973 RX2, Years ago I had 7 of these in different state, This one was the best of all after it took me almost 3 years to build it from all the best parts.Amazing what you do with your money when your single hey?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Specialised urethane shops and mold different shape, size, and hardness. Depends on application, some could be high maintenance. Noise, vibration are just two of the area one should take note. Experiment to replace many parts that were rubber in various different vehicles through the years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeeze, the mounties must've detailed one guy just to follow you around in that. What colour was that? Arrest-me red?

That's funny! good one, You know Ian, I never even got pulled over even once, they drove behind me a few times, then pulled beside to see who was behind the wheel.I guess I was responsible as a driver, it was a very powerfull sounding little car. But it did shoot blue flames out of the exhuast when gearing down or gearing up fast under full throttle, I even did it the gear down thing on Hastings with a cop behind me one time just to see if it was ok.Apparently it was.Oh, and Porshe "Guards red", although I hate that color these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Specialised urethane shops and mold different shape, size, and hardness. Depends on application, some could be high maintenance. Noise, vibration are just two of the area one should take note. Experiment to replace many parts that were rubber in various different vehicles through the years.

Good point, I think they call the hardness meter in rubbers "Durometer"? A, B, or C, group, then a hardness number, I think

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shore Durometer to be exact - presses a fixed dimension rod at a specific pressure and measures the deflection - we played with it in Tech school - take raw rubber and process it at different lengths and pressure of vulcanising - they do a similar thing for testing steel but they use a ball bearing or needle pointed thing (does leave a mark). They have different scales to make thing meaningful - measuring jello and super hard plastic with the same scale would not work too well.You can also get different degrees of stiffness by adding fillers to rubber and by laminating steel etc. into it. Nothing wrong with a correctly designed rubber bushing - but they are cheap and the aftermarket likes it better when they make big $ (you will notice they usually make the urethane ones bright colours for bling bling appeal - has nothing to do with the material in fact black would probably stand up better).Okay here is the trivia question - why is rubber coloured black typically?Cheers,Cameron

Edited by Speedie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the what - of how it gets black - here is the why.Natural or synthetic rubber is easily broken down by sunlight - in addition it is pretty darn soft (i.e. gooey) - by adding carbon black (basically soot) the rubber can be manipulated to a harder state (also converts it from a thermoplastic to a thermoset - so your tires don't melt on hot days or shatter when cold) during vulcanizing (they throw a shot of sulphur and some other good stuff in there too) by adjusting the hold time at temperature in the mold.Cheers,Cameron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I could go scrounge up a trailing arm off of Dad's old LTD with rubber bushings that are 30 years and still good - LOLPM me an address lebikerboy - Have to make a visit to the post office anyways - and I have some give away loot here - prizes are always good!Cheers,Cameron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thinking it might be worth doing just the rear X arm bushings for better grip and to get more tread life from the rear tires ... :dunno:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

    Chatbox
    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More