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deezle

Nissan Leaf EV General Discussion

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Even the hybrids need to have their battery packs replaced after about 8 years.It costs MANY thousands of dollars too.I heard $5000.00or more.Maybe someone would know the exact amount.An all electric car,would be using the batteries 100% of the time, unlike some hybrids.

Need is a strong word methinks. It's not necessary unless your battery is struggling and the engine is running all the time to charge the battery. Remember that there are plenty of Prius taxis running around in Victoria and Vancouver (starting to show up in Edmonton and there's a handful in Winnipeg). These do 100,000-160,000km a year. That means they even run the hybrid warranty out within a year or two (8 years or 160,000km). I mean, the oldest Canadian model would be 9 years old now (if you bought a 2001 in the Fall of 2000) and they're using an inferior battery compared to the Gen 2 (hatchback model)Oh and the current price for a Gen 2 Prius battery is $2,250 US plus labour. Edited by Nextourer

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Replace a battery after ten years, or your engine, choose your poison.

What do you mean? Regular cars don't need their engines replaced every 10 years.

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I have only done a handful of batteries on Honda Insights (1st Gen). The bill is usually around $7000 or so. The less the vehicle is driven, the more often it seems the batteries fail.

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What do you mean? Regular cars don't need their engines replaced every 10 years.

My smart will be over 300,000 km when it's ten, so I'd be a fool not to assume it'll need a rebuild by then. Same with any car....

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My smart will be over 300,000 km when it's ten, so I'd be a fool not to assume it'll need a rebuild by then. Same with any car....

Seriously?!?! wow... Guess I'm used to seing 500,000+ cars on original engines. Mostly Toyotas and Hondas.What's the underlying issue that requires a rebuild? Do the cylinder heads need cleaning? or the cylinders polished? or gunk build-up, or what?

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Diesel engines last longer than gasoline engines. I am hoping for a service life somewhere between 300,000 and 500,000km before major surgery - somewhere around 2020. Heck, I'll be all Soylent Green by then anyway ;)Bil :sun:

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I don't know, my friend's 1994 Camry died definitively at 240,000 km (transmission, relay box and engine all at the same time). So planning, or worse still, financially counting on a car to take you 500,000 km is definitely not clever. If you get that far w/o major work, it's a bonus, in any car.Edit, stupid spelling!!

Edited by Mike T

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That is odd. 240,000km is pretty young for a Camry (Camry or Corolla are the two you can count on going past 300,000 since its their bread and butter cars). Our oldest car is the 2005 Prius (105,000km the last time I checked in with my dad). The 02 Camry was 105,000km back in May '07 before a taxi totalled it.

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Right, but the question is: what is the median km before a major expense on a Camry? My guess: 300,000 km tops, probably less. Same with practically any car. Ergo the folly of financially counting on any car to make 500K.

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Does the generality that diesels last longer than gassers not hold true for the smart CDi? And if so, why?B :sun::scratch:

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I don't believe the smart diesel can be as 'long lasting' as most other diesels. This is because it is very tiny,and lightweight, and runs (highly stressed),at all times.This would be very UNLIKE large 'over-sized' truck engines.

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It is overbuilt compared to the 698 ad 599 cc gasser it was based on, which probably had a median lifespan on 150,000 km......or less.

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If the battery on an EV lasts 5 to 10 years at a cost of $5k to $10k. $500 - $2000 per year, that certainly does not seems extreme to me. There will be nearly zero maintenance to pay for over that time. With any vehicle if you are spending close to $2000 between fuel and maintenance and an EV will fit your needs, I say make the switch. Rent or own a second vehicle for long trips and be all the happier and greener.

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If the battery on an EV lasts 5 to 10 years at a cost of $5k to $10k. $500 - $2000 per year, that certainly does not seems extreme to me. There will be nearly zero maintenance to pay for over that time. With any vehicle if you are spending close to $2000 between fuel and maintenance and an EV will fit your needs, I say make the switch. Rent or own a second vehicle for long trips and be all the happier and greener.

lol. Isn't that most people?A typical 4 cylinder car driven 24,000km/yr will likely be close to the $2k limit in fuel and maintenance. At least that's my experience with our 2002 Camry 4 cylinder.My friend with the TSX will likely be above the $2k limit if driven the same way but he's been cutting back on driving so it should be under. Unfortunately, an EV won't work because he needs to come home (300km) for the holidays or even just for the weekend when he has time and he doesn't have a 2nd accessible vehicle here if he takes the Greyhound.

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Either way these new fangled cars they are coming out with are trouble. Either no one is going to buy them and the companies will loose billions, or, gas will be $10 a gallon and theyll sell lots but we the consumers will be out billions. :o

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Either way these new fangled cars they are coming out with are trouble. Either no one is going to buy them and the companies will loose billions, or, gas will be $10 a gallon and theyll sell lots but we the consumers will be out billions. :o

As usual: the BANKS always win!Bil :sun:Oh ya: and nobody in my city will have a clue how to service them but the main dealer$$$. Edited by bilgladstone

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Even the hybrids need to have their battery packs replaced after about 8 years.It costs MANY thousands of dollars too.I heard $5000.00or more.Maybe someone would know the exact amount.An all electric car,would be using the batteries 100% of the time, unlike some hybrids.

It cost Honda 4600 to replace my 9 year old Insight battery/computers. Lucky for me it had a 10 yr warranty. :lol:

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Ouch? Probably a shifted cost; I bet there were other components that saw a lot less wear (and thus didn't need to be replaced) thanks to the IMA kicking in and sharing the load from the engine.Amortize it out over the age of the vehicle and it's not much, especially when I look at my repair bills on the cdi.-Iain

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I spent about $4500 total on maintenance for my Peugeot 405 for 366,000 km of driving, so yes $9K for a new battery is OUCH!

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The Prius battery pack is $2,588 U.S.. That's just the pack, including changing it you're closer to the $4,500 mark, which is probably similar to changing an engine, if not a bit cheaper.The oldest Prius's (or however you pluralize that) are in Japan dating back to 1997, early 1998. So far there haven't been a lot of failures as these cars enter their 13th year, though at 13 years most cars are pretty worn out. As some one earlier hinted at, one thing different is batteries tend to wear whether you use them or not. So, while an engine may not be worth rebuilding once it's at 250k-300k, even if it's only a few years old, batteries may be fine after that mileage. This is the taxi cab experience. On the flip side, if you just parked your car for 15 years, the engine would be almost like new, and the batteries would probably be shot even if you didn't drive it much. We have a Camry Hybrid, and I fully expect the battery pack to last the life of the car.Cheers! Dang

Edited by Dang

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I spent about $4500 total on maintenance for my Peugeot 405 for 366,000 km of driving, so yes $9K for a new battery is OUCH!

He said $4,600 :huh:

The Prius battery pack is $2,588 U.S.. That's just the pack, including changing it you're closer to the $4,500 mark, which is probably similar to changing an engine, if not a bit cheaper.The oldest Prius's (or however you pluralize that) are in Japan dating back to 1997, early 1998. So far there haven't been a lot of failures as these cars enter their 13th year, though at 13 years most cars are pretty worn out. As some one earlier hinted at, one thing different is batteries tend to wear whether you use them or not. So, while an engine may not be worth rebuilding once it's at 250k-300k, even if it's only a few years old, batteries may be fine after that mileage. This is the taxi cab experience. On the flip side, if you just parked your car for 15 years, the engine would be almost like new, and the batteries would probably be shot even if you didn't drive it much. We have a Camry Hybrid, and I fully expect the battery pack to last the life of the car.Cheers! Dang

Yeah but I'm wondering if the older packs are more expensive (The Gen 1 and 1.5... the Gen 1 uses D-Cells and the 1.5 uses NiMH).$4,600 seems about right if you factor in labour and taxes. Even more amazing is the fact that it's the original Insight. I was expecting those to have more expensive battery replacement costs than the Prius.

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He said $4,600 :huh:

I must have been hallucinating earlier, I thought the post said $9K. Edited by Mike T

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