Duck

How-To: Lubricate the Clutch Actuator (450)

36 posts in this topic

Hi! I usually remove the actuator (3 screws holding), them remove the rubber boot and metal pin. Wash the old dirty lubricant with brake cleaner and put in new lithium greese, and mount it back. 

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Stop dirt and water getting into the mechanism and there will be less need for these procedures. 

Entry points are between rod and rubber boot and between rubber boot and clutch actuator body. Wetting rubber boot in mineral oil as shown in video will make boot swell and ruin actuator due to accelerated ingress of dirt and water. 

Clean areas where boot seals and apply silicone grease. 

Avoid overgreasing internals of actuator as grease may contaminate boot and brush gear on motor. 

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I have been removing the actuator, filling it with automatic transmission fluid through the boot, re-installing on the car, then going through the clutch actuation program using DAS, to cycle the actuator. I then remove the actuator, dump out the ATF, and re-install. I use DAS to then do a clutch drag point re-learn. 

I have been surprised how much "junk" comes out with the ATF. It is safe for plastic/rubber/alloy. My clutch actuators are very smooth and quiet using this method, which I repeat every 25-30k km. It must be said that after the initial service when buying the car, when I've repeated this procedure, the innards of the clutch actuator have still been "wet" and the ATF comes back out pretty clean.

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ATF will make your rubber boot swell leading to ingress of water and dust and the early destruction of your actuator. 

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On 9/10/2009 at 6:08 PM, Duck said:

I made this video for a friend of mine to show how to lubricate the clutch actuator. One of the easiest things you can do to extend the life of one of the main wear components on your car.

 

Cheers,

-Iain

 

Is there a preference to what spray is to be used?

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7 hours ago, tolsen said:

That is a misguided procedure. 

 

What is wrong about it?

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for starters he doesnt clean anything...just blindly sprays into an electronic device ...and doesnt bother to lubricate the clutch fork hole

 

 

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Just now, LooseLugNuts said:

for starters he doesnt clean anything...just blindly sprays into an electronic device ...and doesnt bother to lubricate the clutch fork hole

 

 

 

Mind my ignorance but from my past experiences usually a vehicle forum only pins or tags things that are good procedures for maintenance for the vehicle.

 

I am sure this person just made a quick video, not sure at all what the proper procedure would be as I dont have a smart yet, but I should by the weekend, and this is the first thing I will be doing to the car. Will look for a more thorough way of doing it now though

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the video will work to get rid of the squeaking for a while...but youre better off doing a more thorough service like Tolsen recommends

 

back when the video was made there was probably less knowledge of the clutch actuator breaking thru the clutch fork...and probably less knowledge of the actuator internals and fail points

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