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John & Angela

Best Quality Diesel In Canada...and The Us

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Hi folks. We almost always fill our two CDI's at the superstore because the equivalent 4.5 cents off coupon per litre for the groceries brings the price to about 94 cents per litre. Reading a few other members posts recently i get the impression that there are different quality diesels in Canada...and pssibly the US. Any comments.?? I don't always track the mileage but when i do it seems it is still hovering around 3.8 to 4.1. Most of our K's during our commute are highway at about 90-95 KMH.

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I know all gas varies a bit in quality, and it takes a lab to test a sample to know for sure. I haven't heard of any easy way to really differentiate one gas sample from another.I fill at Superstore as well, but from a fuel economy point of view. That is, I use 'vancouvergasprices.com' to find the cheapest gas in my area, and superstore or Costco have the best price in my travel orbit.

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It was hinted to me by someone who really ought to know that Shell V is not the best fuel for the cdi, and that other name brands are preferable. Mainly Husky...around here. Back east it's a different story.

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It was hinted to me by someone who really ought to know that Shell V is not the best fuel for the cdi, and that other name brands are preferable. Mainly Husky...around here. Back east it's a different story.

That's interesting; I've tried Shell's V-power and thought my car actually performed worse. I'm somewhat encouraged that it wasn't just me.I've always used Sunoco Gold and will go out of my way to get it. Like Bill, I supplement it with 20ml Milligan's and/or 40ml LubeCorp Cetane per tank and it gives me the quietest, smoothest ride.MZ

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On Vancouver Island at least, Husky is NOT one of the better ones for cetane, in fact it is one of the lowest. Shell too. The best locally are Co-op, Chevron and a couple of others.

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Hi folks. We almost always fill our two CDI's at the superstore because the equivalent 4.5 cents off coupon per litre for the groceries brings the price to about 94 cents per litre. Reading a few other members posts recently i get the impression that there are different quality diesels in Canada...and pssibly the US. Any comments.?? I don't always track the mileage but when i do it seems it is still hovering around 3.8 to 4.1. Most of our K's during our commute are highway at about 90-95 KMH.

I was buying Canuck Tire because I save 5c-8c/liter and I've heard here it is at least quite good but I've been having trouble with one of the two stations I get it from. I showed up there at 2:00 AM with 1.5 liters flashing and the diesel pumps were closed. The next day I went back after taking cats to the vet and the diesel was still closed. As I left it was flashing 0.0. I went home then went to an Esso station where it took 23.4 liters.I noticed I was able to drive about 40 km more than usual before the first bubble turned clear. I'm not sure if the fuel is that much better, or if the wind was favourable, or what! I had the AC on all the time since filling it, all week in fact.

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The first blob's longevity depends upon how completely the tank was filled. Evidently you filled it really well this time.

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I noticed I was able to drive about 40 km more than usual before the first bubble turned clear.

40km... hmm. If you usually use 6.0 l/100km this would be about 2.4 litres of fuel. Can the Smart really over fill by that much? If you get 4.0 l/100km, then it's 1.6 litres and 23.4 could really explain that.Does anybody know if there is an independant (of big oil) gas/deisel quality checking service anywhere in North America?

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40km... hmm. If you usually use 6.0 l/100km this would be about 2.4 litres of fuel. Can the Smart really over fill by that much? If you get 4.0 l/100km, then it's 1.6 litres and 23.4 could really explain that.Does anybody know if there is an independant (of big oil) gas/deisel quality checking service anywhere in North America?

I almost always fill it until I can splash in the fuel with my fingertip. (I don't actually DO that but I could if I wanted to!) I figure it will be that much longer before I need to fill again and I'm not aware of any problems it might cause besides spending an extra minute to fill.Since I had done that before, I was able to calculate 4.36 liters/100 km. That was on the Canuck Tire diesel. It's on 5.0 now so I will fill up again after work tomorrow when it will be at 2.0-2.5. I'm not sure if I will fill with Canuck Tire again, Esso, or try that Husky. I would save 8c/liter at Canuck Tire. I think there is a Husky off the 401 in Milton. I would make it there but it's probably not open 24 hours and I'd likely get there after midnight.

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If you're ready to stop in Milton, why not try Truck Town Terminals -- they turn their diesel over FAST, and they have biodiesel blends.

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Husky has Diesel Max at the same price as regular diesel, always much cheaper than 87 gasoline, and I've read it's probably one of the best available.

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If you're ready to stop in Milton, why not try Truck Town Terminals -- they turn their diesel over FAST, and they have biodiesel blends.

They no longer carry biodiesel.

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Really. Well that sucks.Anybody in SO know where the best diesel is in the eastern US Midwest? I've driven Montreal to Erie, PA, a few times (via 1000 Islands/I-81/I-90), and I can only ever find diesel here and there off the Interstate, usually at crappy Exxons. Is Chevron in the east the same super premium diesel as in the west?

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They no longer carry biodiesel.

The government have decided to withhold biodiesel from consumers by taxing it out of the marketplace. Thank goodness oil is so readily available. Just take a pail to the beach and scoop it up!B :sun:

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Husky Diesel Max has a a cetane of 41-43.

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Husky Diesel Max has a a cetane of 41-43.

... and with my additives, it becomes 50-55 so I guess I'll stick with Husky, where I get BCAA points. Also learned that one of the other Husky stations in town (formerly Mohawk) has a diesel pump where I can park nose-down with front wheels off the concrete pad and do a SuperFill!

B :sun:

My "Special Sauce": 1 part Milligan's + 2 parts Cetane Booster

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The local Co-Op is 47-49 straight out of the tank and Chevron is the same.

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If you're ready to stop in Milton, why not try Truck Town Terminals -- they turn their diesel over FAST, and they have biodiesel blends.

I see signs for them when approaching the exit. Is their diesel especially good?Wouldn't it be difficult to fill the Smart with a pump intended for a truck? I've been told that by attendants.

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I believe they have an island that supports light passenger vehicles -- even large one-ton pickups use standard-sized nozzles. The reason it would be a good place to fill isn't for the CN of the fuel (which is likely not much more than 40), but rather because the turnover ensures the cisterns are always full of fresh fuel.

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Hello, (sorry this is a long one...)This discussion of quality of fuel and additives has gotten me thinking... Are Additives really necessary, and do they really work, and even if they do, are they worth the extra cost? I have been trolling through many a forum on fuel quality and found a really good discussion on this in "the diesel page forums," The diesel page forumsThere is one poster who has a summary of the ultra low sulfur change and lubricity as it relates to additives. He seems to have some substance so I am going to pass on one of his (long) posts here:(Note the Second Paragraph of the Second (nested) quote at to brands and features.)

HH,The refineries are required to treat the ULSD to maintain the lubricity and corrosion protection offered by LSD. Whether they do or not is the question. I'm hearing that the refineries are actually attempting to remove all of the sulfur from the fuel, expecting some residual contamination from the distribution system. This lowers lubricity even further. The fines to the refineries for not meeting the targeted sulfur levels are onerous. I think in the long run, it'll all be sorted out, and we won't need to worry. It's the short term switch-over period that we may need to be concerned about.Stanadyne told me that treating the fuel at the recommended ratio should restore ULSD to LSD lubricity levels even without additional refinery treatment. They went further, saying that a Performance Formula treatment ratio at 2x would provide added insurance (and increase sales of treatment....).I'm told 1% bio will add 65% of the lost lubricity, so a 2% bio-diesel (B2) would add back all we need. Additionally, I'm hearing that some ULSD diesel fuel distributors in MN are actually using bio as the lubricity treatment.... Here's what Power Service sent to me in response to my request for info about their fuel treatment and diesel fuel lubricity.... Quote:There have been many changes in the last few years to the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) D975 standard for diesel fuel. In January 2005 a new fuel lubricity standard ASTM D6079 was established for diesel fuel. This is a test method for evaluating lubricity of diesel fuel as measured by the HFRR (High Frequency Reciprocating Rig) Test with a wear scar not to exceed 520 microns. In all likelihood lubricity will be added at the refinery. Because this test is not precise there is an acceptable variance from 520 to 570 micron. Since it is more expensive to get the fuel down to the 520 micron wear scar most fuels will probably be closer to the 570. Lubricity is also more crucial for the smaller pickups and small cars than the big rigs. According to a study conducted by BOSCH ,which includes the interest of Stanadyne, Siemens, Denso and Delphi, the new standard for light duty fuel injection equipment is not even borderline. They are saying that the fuel needs to be at least 460 micron and they really want, but will not get, a HFRR 380 micron. In their study they say that for DFIE (diesel fuel injection equipment) fuel lubricity is the most valuable and crucial property and that Common-rail and Rotary pumps require the same level of lubricity. It should also be pointed out that injectors also benefit from better fuel lubricity. DFS, Diesel Kleen and Diesel 911 will get the lubricity of the fuel below the HFRR 520 and provide excellent fuel pump protection. For the fuel pumps in diesel vehicles the fuel is the lubricating agent. If the fuel does not have adequate lubricity the fuel pumps will wear faster and can end in damage and pump failure. Power Service has several products that provide excellent lubricity protection and are labeled with the SlickDiesel logo. Diesel Fuel Supplement (DFS), Diesel Kleen and Diesel 911 all contain this excellent lubricity package. Diesel Fuel Supplement is the Number 1 selling diesel fuel additive in the USA. It is the best product to use for winter and it contains detergents to keep injectors from getting dirty, Cetane Boost to help with faster and easier engine starts, reduced emissions and white smoke, lessens engine noise and aids in faster engine warm-up. DFS contains SlickDiesel for excellent lubricity protection. When using the quart and 96-ounce containers a single treat is 1-ounce to each 3-gallons of fuel. If you add 25 gallons to your fuel tank then you would add 9-ounces of DFS (25 divided by 3 equals 8.3 [round fractions up to the next whole number] or 9-ounces of DFS). To add a double treat then just double this number or add 18-ounces. Diesel Kleen is the best non-winter product that you can use and is the Number 2 selling diesel fuel additive in the USA. Diesel Kleen does not have an antigel so it contains more detergents and more Cetane Boost than DFS. The detergents are strong enough to clean up dirty injectors within the spray pattern range of a new injector. Diesel Kleen will give even better fuel economy and will pay for itself when used with every fillup. Diesel Kleen has a better stability package, will increase the Cetane Boost of the fuel even better than DFS and also contains SlickDiesel. Both products will also help control condensation. The treat rate for Diesel Kleen in the quart and 96-ounce containers are the same as for DFS. Diesel 911 is the third best selling diesel fuel additive in the USA and it also contains SlickDiesel. Diesel 911 is intended to be used to get people out of trouble especially during the winter. Free water causes about one-third of all fuel flow problems in the winter. Diesel 911 does not contain an antigel but it will disperse water and help prevent water related problems in both summer and winter. Use Diesel 911 just before winter to disperse water caused by condensation and to prevent fuel filter icing when the first cold spell hits. Use 1 gallon to each 200 gallons of fuel or 1-ounce to each 1.5 gallons of fuel to pre-treat fuel tanks. Diesel 911 can also be used to de-ice frozen fuel filters and help to reliquefy gelled diesel fuel in big rigs. Diesel 911 also contains SlickDiesel.DFS and Diesel Kleen are made to be used with every fillup and will solve most of the problems associated with diesel fuel. When you use these with every fillup your equipment will work better, last longer and have fewer repairs. The increase in fuel economy alone will pay for the additive and the other benefits are the icing on the cake. I hope this answers some of your questions about our products and lubricity issues with the new Ultra Low Diesel Fuels coming on the market. Let me know if you have any other questions or concerns. Best regards,Power Service Products, Inc. I should add that GM only recommends a water-demulsifying fuel treatment. PS is a water-emulsifying treatment.... There are pros and cons for each, and some opinions have been stated here in this board. If I had to make a recommendation, it would be to err on the side of warranty protection and follow GM's advice - though after 20 years of driving a GM diesel pickup, I've yet to hear of a warranty dispute arising from using a fuel treatment. Jim

Tony

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Anyway, I have a couple of thoughts on all this:1. If all Diesel is now supposed to be B3, or 3% Biodiesel, is that enough to add the missing Lubiricity? this discussion was during the 2006 change to Ultra-Low-Sulfur-Diesel, have the refineries managed to solve the lubricity problem and bring their levels up? Or in other words, is late 2010 petro diesel as good or better than ever?2. For my own car, I bought some 3-in-1 Diesel treatment: Lubricity, Injector cleaner and anti-gelling. It adds about 7.5 cents per liter, but I think it's best for reducing long term engine wear.Tony

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I use Milligan's Diesel Fuel Conditioner. Have done for years. Cost adds 2-4cts per litre. 100% Organic, non-toxic and 100% Canadian.

Milligan’s Diesel Fuel Conditioner benefits:

[*]Renewable and environmentally friendly

[*]Improves lubricity

[*]Up to a 10% increase in fuel economy

[*]Reduces friction caused by Ultra Low Sulphur Diesel

[*]Up to a 40 % reduction in engine wear

[*]Cleans injectors

[*]Improves starting

[*]Reduces smoke and emissions

[*]Milligan Bio-Tech Quality Guarantee

[*]SAFE for DPF's and WINTER use

Bil :sun:

Edited by bilgladstone

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The smart cdi was designed for fuel with <50 PPM S in the fuel so lubricity should not be a concern. It is a different story in older diesels....

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