jzuk

Block Heater Plug Replacement

48 posts in this topic

I HATE the stupid little pin outlet for the block heater. Always gets full of ice. One day I forgot to unplug, so I ended up pulling the plug apart on the cord before I realized it. :weird:

http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn204/j...¤t=DSC00333.jpg

So today I changed all that. :D

I knew that there are nice plugs on some of the big rigs I drive. Nice little flap to keep the dirt out, and the cord plugs right in. The big rig part costs about $80, but there is a similar plug for boats to plug in their battery charger for $30 (or cheaper online).

http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn204/j...¤t=DSC00328.jpg

http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn204/j...¤t=DSC00331.jpg

First take out the old plug.

http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn204/j...¤t=DSC00338.jpg

The hole is a bit too small.

http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn204/j...¤t=DSC00336.jpg

Sorry I did not take any pic's of the wiring, but it's super simple. Green wire go's in green hole, white in white, black in black hole and tighten the screws. Backing has a nice cover to keep dirt out from that end, I put some electrical tape on to cover any gaps.

Put plug in and secure. There is a large 'nut' to secure the plug on the back (when wiring the wires go through nut), there're three little screw to use on the front as well.

http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn204/j...¤t=DSC00340.jpg

http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn204/j...¤t=DSC00339.jpg

http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn204/j...¤t=DSC00341.jpg

I added a little circle clip to the flap that opens the cover, something to help with mittens on.

I don't do many of these DIY write up's. I use so much of the info here I thought I should contribute. :):icon_smile:

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That is a great solution I'll have to keep that in mind in case I ever do the same thing. I've found it easier to keep the block heater cord attached to the car at all times during the winter. I unplug it from the outlet on the wall and wrap it around the driver side mirror pinning the end of the cord behind the radio antenna. Save me the trouble of cleaning out the snow from the front of the car every day when I get home.

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I HATE the stupid little pin outlet for the block heater. Always gets full of ice. One day I forgot to unplug, so I ended up pulling the plug apart on the cord before I realized it. :weird:

Posted Image

So today I changed all that. :D

I knew that there are nice plugs on some of the big rigs I drive. Nice little flap to keep the dirt out, and the cord plugs right in. The big rig part costs about $80, but there is a similar plug for boats to plug in their battery charger for $30 (or cheaper online).

Posted Image

Posted Image

First take out the old plug.

Posted Image

The hole is a bit too small.

Posted Image

Sorry I did not take any pic's of the wiring, but it's super simple. Green wire go's in green hole, white in white, black in black hole and tighten the screws. Backing has a nice cover to keep dirt out from that end, I put some electrical tape on to cover any gaps.

Put plug in and secure. There is a large 'nut' to secure the plug on the back (when wiring the wires go through nut), there're three little screw to use on the front as well.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

I added a little circle clip to the flap that opens the cover, something to help with mittens on.

I don't do many of these DIY write up's. I use so much of the info here I thought I should contribute. :):icon_smile:

Perhaps it is clearer now. Editing those photos links was quite a struggle.

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Looks like the re-do will save you some hassle. Looks like you did a good job as well :-)Been lucky in that I've not had that problem happen -- but the leak in my '06 Cabrio has returned. I had ruled out the windshield first off, then taped off the seams of the roof. Then, after the next big rain I still had water under the passenger seat.Think I'll worry more about it when the weather gets warmer, right now I put up a quickie tarp/tent and but a heater and blowers inside to dry things up.Best of luck, hope the retrofit works - looks like it's superior to the original!Tom

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Just wanted to update.Works great. The rubber cover is pushed in to close off the plug. With the cold weather the rubber get's a little stiff, but still way better then stock. :thumbsup_still: Happy with what I've done (wife's happy too)

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very nice idea, glad some 1 came up with an idea of getting rid of that useless factory cord.

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cannot seem to access the pics?Mike

email or PM Speedie and ask him to be made a "Regular Member"

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email or PM Speedie and ask him to be made a "Regular Member"

Done - shouldn't have affected ability to see the pictures though - maybe try a refresh on the browser or a different browserCheers,Cameron

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I'm going to have to do the same thing as my front electrical connector got broken last year. I've got the onboard charger inlet ordered and today, while doing some other work on the car, I disconnected the front connector from its normal location. Still wired up but I've undone all the screws so the connector is loose inside the front bumper area. The one thing I'm kinda concerned about is the wiring. There seems to be very little slack in the wire cable. Jzuk, did you have a similar problem or did you have plenty of slack available to do your wiring?

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Maybe I'm missing something, but I've never had trouble with the cap on the existing receptacle. It seals out the snow and slush just fine.

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The one thing I'm kinda concerned about is the wiring. There seems to be very little slack in the wire cable. Jzuk, did you have a similar problem or did you have plenty of slack available to do your wiring?

If you feel around up there, kind of behind the wheel, the cable is just attached with zip-ties (at least it was on mine). You can work a bit more slack out by maneuvering the cable around a bit. Just make sure to still keep it out of the way of normal wheel/steering movement.I got rid of the factory connector in the fall because I had no interest in even trying to use it. It looked like it would easily get clogged with snow/ice, be impossible to connect/disconnect with mitts on, and break easily. Plus, I didn't have the cord and wasn't particularly fond of its price. Given the apparent lack of cold-weather intelligence the engineers have demonstrated in several other aspects of the car, I was also guessing that it's probably an inferior cord that doesn't flex well at low temperatures. So, off went the connector.My solution was a little more ghetto. With some determination and a half-afternoon of lying in the parking lot, I cut off some of the zip-ties behind the wheel well (to give me enough slack to work), spliced on a foot of flexible rubbery cable using wire nuts, covered the splice with lots of electrical tape, and zip-tied it back into place. Brought the rubbery cable out the hole where the factory connector used to be, filled the hole with a bunch of black silicone, and put a normal male plug end on the cable. So I have a yellow plug dangling a couple inches off the front. Just like all the "normal" cars. I routed it behind the vertical plastic (to the left in the top picture earlier in this thread), so it can tuck in front of the radiator when not in season.The problem with the marine inlet shown above is that you can only use extension cords that have a single outlet on a round end. The really nice Noma Winerflex cables all have a three-outlet rectangular end. Could be cut off and replaced of course, but then you'd lose the little orange light they put in the end for confirming that there's power. And it looks to me like it would still be difficult to use with mitts on.

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Oh well!Changed over my front bumper plug today to one of those Marinco connectors. That all went quite nicely. I jacked up the front of the car and took off the bottom plastic panel for easier access. The electrical and mechanical parts of the job were easy. Thought that was it, now let's check to make sure things are okay by plugging a small heater into the interior pass through connector and then plug in the mains power to the front of the car through the new connector. Did so, heard a buzzing, crackling sound for a few seconds and then nothing. The small heater wasn't working and we checked and the breaker to that power outlet had blown. Reset it and now it is fine. Plugged in car again - no little heater this time - and we have the buzzing, crackling sound again and then nothing. Breaker blown again. Had no time today to investigate further. Tomorrow I'll be able to have another look at things. Obviously there's some sort of short in the wiring and the sounds I heard were coming from the rear of the car. Seems like there might be a short near, or at, the block heater itself. Hopefully it's somethig that can be repaired easily. Would hate to have gone to this effort of replacing the front bumper connector only to find that the whole block heater cord and assembly has to be replaced.I saw in another thread that some other folks have had a similar "shorting" problem recently although no one has yet mentioned finding/fixing it.Fingers crossed.

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Another Option, if you don't want to have to 'work' and you want to keep your car stock is the Connect and Forget cable I offer. Screws on to the stock connector and stays there while you travel to and fro.

Buy it Here!

post-1622-1299977320_thumb.jpg

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Thanks JZUKMy plug pins have corroded out finally despite keeping the cover on at all times. I am currently using the internal plug to feed the block heater but when the weather gets better I will probably use your solution for a permanent replacement part. Good idea.2seat

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I checked out the actual block heater area on Sunday afternoon and took some photos. Hopefully I can attach some properly. The two large leads going into the lump which is the block heater are in terrible shape. Corroded like crazy and one of them had shorted out and you can see a lot of material deposited on the transmission housing. Looks like weld spatter. I'll have to get a a new one.

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post-331-1300199490_thumb.jpg

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wow the salt air is really chewed that heater up.i agree with tolsen there an pick up a inline water heater as the mb 1 is quite a penny. but 120v i take it by the user name you work for rnc?

Edited by fordnut71

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wow the salt air is really chewed that heater up.i agree with tolsen there an pick up a inline water heater as the mb 1 is quite a penny. but 120v i take it by the user name you work for rnc?

I'd say it's more likely to be all the salt we use on the roads around here. Corrosion heaven.BobbyClobber was a character created by Dave Broadfoot when he was part of the Royal Canadian Air Farce. Bobby Clobber was an older hockey player who seemed to have taken one (or hundreds) too many hits to the head. He sometimes seemed to not quite follow the point of the questions he was being asked during the skit's interview so his answers seemed rather funny. Funny at the time anyway, but perhaps not so funny anymore given the widespread concern about concussions in contact sports like hockey and football.

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Big Bobby Clobber!And Mike From Canmore.....

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Posted (edited) · Report post

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I assume most RV inlet connectors are designed such that inboard end may not be weather tight as intended located in a dry space.  Certainly, that is the case for RV inlet connectors sold in the uk. 

 

The Defa inlet connector fitted originally on some of the Canadian Smart cars is weather tight both inboard and outboard.

 

The IEC inlet connector kindly suggested by GRP151 in the now regrettably closed thread may turn out still to be fit for purpose provided its inboard end is suitably sealed. 

My IEC connectors arrived last week and I was pleased to find the pins are plated brass hence won’t rust.  Have not yet made up my mind whether to fit connector on the front or in boot. Fitting inside boot is much easier and then connector ought to outlast my Smart. 

 

 

 

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Regarding photobucket fiasco, can anyone  with their head better screwed on than mine explain why in post one no photos can be seen whilst in post three where I quote the   original poster all photos can be plainly seen. 

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