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tolsen

More power out of your Cdi - for free!

302 posts in this topic

With a connection to the turbo return, if the top pipe should get clogged the oil will quickly evacuate fro the turbo return to the air intake. (maybe this will never happen)As for TIK vacuum, I was thinking the vacuum could cause the same problem, but then realized it shouldn't.

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Thanks Pinhead19. I'll play it safe and drain to dip stick tube. Have found it is feasible after all.

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Inlet manifold viewed from below. Managed to remove another gram of soot so total removed is 34 grams. Note that I had rodded out lots of dirt a few months ago before starting this thread. Cleaning by rodding is quick and easy. Removing inlet manifold is something I would not recommend. Common rail has to be removed as bolted on to inlet manifold and to provide space for removal of manifold.

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I also took the opportunity to remove rocker cover.

Here is something interesting:

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Rocker cover has the usual internal baffle space. Breather gas outlet pipe is conical and widest at the exit. Oil entering the cone has no other way to go than towards the exit and into TIK pipe. A large amount of oil is always present inside the cone when removing the L shaped rubber hose.

Unverified solution hopefully reducing some oil in breather gases:

Note the square void space on right and side of photo. This space is serving no purpuse so I decided to drain oil from the conical exit pipe into this space.

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3.5 mm hole drilled at 6 o'clock radially into conical exit pipe.

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Another 3.5 mm hole drilled from square void space into baffle space near main drain back to sump.

Discussion:

I assume breather gases enter baffle space though the rectangular opening near filler cap. The long vertical spigot

seen on right hand side of photo is probably only a drain back to sump. Spigot has small bore no more than 6 mm

so unsuitable for breather gases.

Strange that the conical exit pipe starts in the middle of baffle space and not at spigot drain end.

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I think that your little drain hole from the "breather cone" to the spigot drain is a "must do" to accompany your "stop the oil creep" device. Otherwise oil stopped by that device would simply accumulate in the cone, puddling up to the lower lip of the bore inlet and you might actually be worse off than without it, as fumes would be flowing over a little puddle of oil as they enter the CCV pipe.

I wonder if it will make cute whistling noises?

It is interesting to note the circuitous path that fumes must take past the straight baffles inside the collecting chamber. Also the drain surfaces inclined away from the conical outlet's inlet. ... making up terminology as we go!

I must reiterate my gratitude, TK, not for just doing this work but most especially for sharing your notes and photos with us!

Bil :sun:

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Strange that the conical exit pipe starts in the middle of baffle space and not at spigot drain end.

This looks like the best solution yet. The tube is conical because this is a rather long draw in a die cast mould so there is lots of draft on the sliding pin (once the oil is in the cone, I don't think that it really mattered how much draft there was on the tube because it would tend to flow outwards anyways).The exit pipe seems to be positioned at the highest point of the internal baffle plate and hence as far as possible from the lowest point which is where the drain hole is located. Inside this conical tube might be a good place to put a small baffle to encourage the oil to use your new drain hole. There is still a risk that both holes now direct oil out of the valve cover ...Gordo Edited by gordo.bernard

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I pulled my EGR (permanently) today.

Are you going to sell it now?Weird that it's so gummed up after less than a tank of fuel....mine has about 150,000 km on it and it's still fine, as far as CEL codes are concerned.

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I guess it would depend also on which is lower, the lower lip of the narrow end of the conical tube, or the lower lip of the stop creep device. There is no fluid pressure on the pooled oil, so if the casting's opening is even slightly lower, it should drain back to the lower rocker pan continuously. Remember, without the Stop Creep device, the outlet hole is definitely lower than the cone's inlet, so even the pooling is preferable.

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Are you going to sell it now?

Weird that it's so gummed up after less than a tank of fuel....mine has about 150,000 km on it and it's still fine, as far as CEL codes are concerned.

No, I prefer to hang on to it for the moment. I never had a code from the original one even when it was removed at 79500 Km. I just noticed performance was lacklustre and there were strange intake noises. Upon removal they confirmed that the valve was stuck open.

Even MB Foreman Neighbour was rather surprised when I showed him the EGR yesterday (the installation of which he approved just a few weeks ago).

One thing I noticed right away, apart from noticeable seat-of-the-pants effects, was lower IATs. I always scan through IAT when driving and make note of conditions. Yesterday was 11° and rainy. Normal IATs before were 27-33, yesterday was solid at 22°. Isn't the IAT sensor in the IC, upstream of the EGR?

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IAT sensor is in the outlet from the lower intercooler plenum so, yes, it is ahead of - upstream - the EGR.B :senile:

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Nearly there almost ready for testing. A wee bit delayed as I found a hole in inboard gaiter on port side drive shaft. Got a replacement gaiter from a local garage for less than 3 pounds including stainless steel straps.Removing dip stick tube is easier said than done. Very difficult access to remove upper bolt. Have brazed on a branch on dip stick tube but got it blanked off temporarily as I will be measuring and monitoring amount of oil collected for at least another week.I am still baffled by the design of the baffle chamber. I am wondering if oil separation will be significantly improved if breather gases were arranged to pass through the whole length of the space rather than only half?Would also be interesting to check out baffle chamber on the new Cdi engine. One would assume some improvements have been made since this engine has a particulate filter.

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I looked at that bolt last weekend and was hoping the turbo's oil return would make more sense. :)

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Re oil pooling in conical breather chamber: Only if you never ever turn right!Very interesting development work going on here. After looking at the photos of the ventilation air path a thought comes to mind. Would a tough coarse fibrous mesh like that used on oil-bath air cleaners filling the conical chamber help, preferably in conjunction with the additional drain holes. Although that requires more serious disassembly work! If you're going to that extent, also filling the internal baffle space would help. Whatever is used MUST be tough and durable, well retained with no loose particles for obvious reasons.I quite understand Tolsen's bafflement at the baffle chamber design. Not very well thought out at all. That dead chamber space should have a cyclonic separator cast into it! The air continues the full length of the baffle chamber, the oil dropped out in the baffle chamber drains out the existing drain, the air enters the cyclone and exit top center (with a creep ring, yes indeed) and a small center bottom drain for the last few drops of oil.Looking at my car just now. A slightly less efficient but simple and effective self draining separator may be possible fitting into existing space, installed and serviced from the top. There is a bit of height over the air exit from engine, so as long as you slope the feed pipe and have enough catch chamber to hold maximum oil catchment from a single tank of fuel it can all drain back when the engine is stopped. I'm gonna think about this, and continue to enjoy what Tolsen is both capable of and willing to do!

Edited by Alex

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Another test completed. Drove 108 km. Air oil separator collected 5.623 cm3 of good black engine oil. 5.623 cm3 oil collected in 108 km becomes 0.0521 cm3 oil collected per km driven or 0.521 liters oil collected over an oil change interval of 10,000 km which is exactly the same collection rate as before drilling drain holes in rocker cover.I'm a bit disappointed but the good news is that collection rate did not increase. Have removed rocker cover again and have now increased size of drain hole from conical exit pipe to the void space below from 3.5 mm to 8 mm in diameter. Have also removed some material from bottom of conical pipe so oil can drain by gravity to the 8 mm drain hole. Bored out drain hole in bottom of void space from 3.5 mm to 4.0 mm.

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You may not be able to decrease the amount of oil you are collecting by modify the inside of the engine. Your separator is making the oil solidify out of the oil vapor that exits the engine. When I watch my vent there is no oil, just oil mist or vapor. That could explain why your modification is not draining the oil back into the engine.

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So perhaps as kooky a design as it looks, the baffle system works optimally? Without more coalescing medium in there (more baffling or a screen or mesh), all that's leaving the chamber is mist.

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The oil that pools at exit end of conical pipe is certainly oil. I've got it all back together and is off for another 60 km test run. Will know in an hour if the last modification worked. If not I have a plan B.

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I need to correct the oil collection rates that I published recently. I read off level in collection tube within minutes of finishing each test run and did not wait for oil to drain and settle. Have to add 1.5 cm to each reading which means the collection rates with unmodified baffle chamber were around 0.075 cm3/ km and 0.061 cm3/ km with drain holes drilled.

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Oil collected during last and final test run.

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The gas outlet from the top of your separator should have been temporarily run to a (vented) catch can to provide a germane analysis of how important the modified baffle chamber is. If very little oil bypasses the separator, then the separator is sending as much oil back to the sump as the drilled baffle chamber.

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I am happy with the final arrangement and won't be doing any more testing. Have no more oil pooling in conical exit pipe before connection to rubber hose.

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Have plumbed in oil drain from cyclone air oil separator to dip stick sounding tube.

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Used a transparent plastic pipe. You can see there is oil in it if you look carefully. The drain pipe is the one strapped in position with white tie wraps seen below black square hollow section (my rear steel crash bar) and exhaust.

I consider that the cyclone air oil separator is another great success.

A bonus us that fuel consumption on my last tank improved by 10% compared to my normal average. Engine seems to have more power. This perhaps needs further verification to be sure.

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Photo shows how the cyclone air oil separator is connected up. Bottom of cyclone is strapped onto the blanked off EGR pipe so no risk of melting hose or tie wrap.

Edited by tolsen

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:clapping::ballons::beerchug: ,,,,, :bowdown:Anyone care to make a 1:1 drawing that I can give to my plumber friend so he can make one for me?Bil :senile:

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Anyone care to make a 1:1 drawing that I can give to my plumber friend so he can make one for me?

Bil :senile:

I think there is sufficient info in this thread so you can make your own sketch.

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Modifying baffle space by adding drain holes only made a marginal improvement so not really worth the effort. Removing rocker cover requires engine to be dropped similar to when fitting restrictor plug.

The cyclone air oil separator seams to be sufficiently efficient to cope with the extra oil.

Plumbing oil drain back to sump of engine is not really required. A small catch tank will suffice as long as it is drained regularly. Note that max expected volume of oil collected over 10,000 km of driving can easily equal the volume of a whiskey bottle.

Result of air oil separator collection tests are published in table below:

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:Anyone care to make a 1:1 drawing that I can give to my plumber friend so he can make one for me?Bil :senile:

It is unlikely a plumber will be able to make one of these unless he has equipment for metal spinning. Try a coppersmith instead.

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... A bonus us that fuel consumption on my last tank improved by 10% compared to my normal average. Engine seems to have more power. This perhaps needs further verification to be sure.

I have just done my further verification of power output.

Some time ago I had a thread on Smartz forum about tuning boxes. Tested one at various settings and compared with no tuning box at all. When switching the tuning box to the highest setting it was possible to drive 8 km/h faster up a dull Scottish hill. With my cleaned up inlet manifold and intercooler, I found I can now drive up same hill at 103 km/hour which is faster than highest speed obtained with tuning box.

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Regrettably I could only do test B as somebody has removed my marker pole so not possible to do test A.

Is this not sufficient proof that it indeed is possible to get more power for free?

Perhaps title of this thread can now be changed back to its original "More power out of your Cdi - for free!"

Edited by tolsen

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