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dieselkiki

Cylinder Head

93 posts in this topic

Hi guys,

From last winter, my CDI have some problems to startup. As soon as it's a bit cold (-5°c), the engine must be start with starting fluid or brake cleaner. From almost the same time, I noticed that during acceleration at high rev or when I floor it to restart at intersection, I can see a black smoke outside the back glass. By the same time, my EGR valve is often carbonised due to sooth in the exhaust gazes. I also noticed that when I floor the trottle pedale and engine run under 2200 rpm, there are a noise... something like an exhaust leak and the engine run like missfiring. But over 2500 tr/min... the noise and missfires are less perceptible.

So, with all that symptoms, I begin to think about a valve or a valve seat failure. I would like to performed a compression test to help me to diagnostic but I dont have the compression test adapters and the dealer (thieves), ask me over 250$ to do a compression test! HAHAHA!! No way!

Luckily, I got a used blown engine and the cylinder head look fine. I took it to an "engine rebuilder shop" last week and they surfaced the head facing (removed 0,003"), they inspect the head valves, valves seats, valves guides and removed the broken glowplug stuck with a broken extractor inside. I put new exhaust manifold studs with new stainless nuts & washers. I think that I'm ready to proceed but...

Now... the reals questions who need reals answers: someone got the torque chart for the cylinder head / intake manifold / exhaust manifold / HP pump / valves cover bolts?? Do I must replaced the hydraulic lifters or I can re-use the old ones? Do I must replace the turbo and the timing chain if mine work realy fine but got over 120000km (turbo), 185000km (timing chain) on it?? Is it possible to buy a cylinder gasket and bolts somewhere else than dealer?

If someone did that kind of job on his smart CDI, advice will be realy appreciate!

Of course, some pictures of the head. ;)

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Edited by dieselkiki

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Given that most blown engines are from failures of chains (due to tensioners failing) or lifters, I would replace those. Lifters, cam chain, oil pump chain and the tensioners for both. Turbo is external and easy to access, so no need if it sounds/looks healthy. Plenty of turbos go over 200K km as long as the dealer doesn't get an opportunity to replace it to "fix" an unrelated oil leak.If you buy the parts from Flying Tiger, he'll probably be happy to send the torque charts...

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Hmm... it's a fact. The chain tentioner must be replace and a bad lifter could make the roker lever falling beside the top of valve and make alot of damages. Do you know if there are a new desing or a more reliable timing chain tentioner available or is it the same as previous models?Thank you Alex.

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Yes, I think the rocker failure problems actually start with the lifter, the hammering that then happens breaks the rocker.

I don't think the tensioner has changed.

Consider a new thermostat and Tolsen's restrictor plug while you have easy access, also be sure to clean and tighten the starter solenoid wire connection.

A good inspection of the starter and alternator would be advisable as well. Clean out the intake manifold.

Anything else?

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Yes. Do you know if I can remove the head with the engine in the car or I must take it out? (for toquing) :huh: About the restictor plug... my cdi engine overheat easily. I replaced thermostat last winter and the warmup time is descent. I dont make city riding or stop & go travel. Just road and highway. It be helpful to faster warmup!And I want to know... is it necessary to replace the tentioner actuator. You know, the piston who push against the tentioner? Maybe the front crank seal too could be replace... Hmm, my dealer will be happy! $$$ <_<

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I can't wait to open my engine to see if the source of my problem are the valves or valves seat!! I hope so...

Edited by dieselkiki

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I think I got all the parts I'll need and almost all torque setting. I'm ready to replace the head tomorrow. Could it be useful to take the time to make pictures of the job or I'll just waste my time?? I'm not sure that alot of members here will replace the cylinder head on there CDI.

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Please do take photos, it will be useful!

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Ok. I'm doing the job now but I have a probleme. There's no timing marks on the cam and on the crank. Someone know where is it or how to do the timing on OM660?? :huh:

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Thanks for the link but unfortunatly... no. There is no marks on the damper pulley on OM660 and the cam sprocket are not the same. :(But I hope if I put the piston #1 on TDC and the valves in euh... (how to say...) "between 2 opening", it will be ok. (I realy hope).So, there are 2 problems found at this time on my CDI. The first one is the timing chain touch to the other side of the timing chain (chain very worn). And the camshaft sprocket is very worn too. Some top of tooth are missing due to worn. So... I realy dont know why! I did my oil change every 7-8000km!! The second problem (the one I hope there was), cyl. #3 valve seat is damage. It's hard to see on the pictures but the #3 exhaust valve is deeper seating in the head than the other exhaust valves. I must wait monday morning to order a timing chain and a camshaft sprocket to replace mine. :(Sorry for my bad english. My mom has decided to pu myself in the world in that province who call (Québec). I try to do my best but I'm not a perfect billingual.So, I go back to the garage to put back the intake manifold and the glowplugs. I'll put some picture... maybe this evening.

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Hé aucun problème !I think the timing chains destroy the sprockets because the tensioners break - was yours broken?

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Even no!! The chain tentioner (slider & pusher) was in perfect condition. You can look at my pictures! Almost no worn on it. I have replaced it because I bought it but the old tentioner could be good for another 185000km! But the spocket was bad and the chain too. Maybe a desing defect. <_< The crankshaft sprocket was good too. I replaced the oil pump chain, tentionner and both sprockets. It was not that bad but I get the parts.

One interesting thing I saw when I begun the project was the difference between original lifters and the lifter I bought to mbz dealers yesterday. These news ones will lasting more than the originals (I hope).

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So, some pics of the "project":

I'was happy! The injectors was not "weld" in the head.

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On the next picture, you can see the chain contact due to worn.

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On the top, there is my spocket (185000km) on the bottom there is one of an other engine (82000km).

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Pistons top and cylinder bores look good But I saw a most visible carbon ridge to the top of the third cylinder than the others. Maybe due to the bad compression on this cylinder.

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The new oil pump driving kit!

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The old head. We can see that the exhaust valve on the #3 cylin look more deep in the head than the other ones. I hope that will fixe my cold start and my smoke/performance problem.

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I put a "brand used" EGR valve. :P That's juste an old EGR valve I have cleaned there's some months.

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I hope that my old turbo will last for some km! I'm juste clean it and put all news gaskets on it.

Edited by dieselkiki

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Today, I make a deep inspection of the chain and sprocket to find why is it so worn. After a good cleaning, I saw a broken roller on a chain link. There are unusual movement between some other chain link. I think that is the source of the sprocket premature worn. But why the roller chain link broke as is?? I'll take these parts to the dealer tomorrow and I hope to find answer to my questions.

Better quality pictures of the chain and sprocket:

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THANK YOU for taking the extra time to photograph your work!

Bil :sun:

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Very good photos Dom, the chain failure is crazy!!

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You'r welcom. ;) But you know, it's just a kind of "give and take". I find alot of technical help and advices on this site. It's just normal to do my best to contribute as I can for the other one that my posts could help! This is my way of thinking. Tomorrow I'll remove the oil pan to inspect if there are no metal particles in the bottom. I'll call to order the new chain and camshaft sprocket. I hope they got it to Toronto. Have a good week! ;)

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Ref timing chain with broken link roller.Query: Is that the link that was peened when originally fitting timing chain?Inspect chain from sides to see if peening looks different.

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Would they not press in the final pin as on a bicycle chain? Peening would be dangerous, as you are implying.

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A riveted chain link is available as a part (Q0007681V0010). It is more likely the chain came already joined from chain manufacturer but still worth while looking into what caused the roller to fail.

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Peening, done correctly, is the best way to secure a chain. The chain is made in a continuous length in a machine, which will automatically peen over the rivets. When a chain loop of a specific size is made it is cut to length, then a new link is added to join it and peened, hopefully in a fixture by someone who knows what they are doing. The appearance of the rivet will be different. Cheap manufacturing re-uses the link opened up to separate the chain, presses it back together with rusty vise-grips, and whacks it with a hammer to ensure it is twisted out of alignment but probably won't fall out of the now-enlarged and ovalized hole in the outer link right away.Master links are less desirable because it is not a tight fit in the outer link that removes, this becomes a wear point that shouldn't be and is usually the failure point. Pressed-in links (bicycle chains) are OK in very light chains that wear out prematurely from the horrid conditions a bike chain endures, but the forces needed to get a proper fit in a real chain and the need to establish proper clearances make it a poor choice for field installation. A proper fixture applied peened new joining link is best, a master link is OK, pressed in done well is OK but difficult to ensure it is done well, especially in an un-controlled field environment.Back to the specific failure here, the failed link appears twisted out of line. I suspect an object, perhaps the broken tip of the tooth jammed the chain. Is there wear marks on the inner link of the damaged point, indicating the chain was repeatedly trying to go sideways at that point? Is there excess looseness at that point, indicating a progressive wear failure, or is it fairly consistent, indicating a sudden one-time event?(If the chain remains in service subsequent to a sudden event wear will occur, and it can be very difficult to ascertain the sequence of events.)Are the sprockets or chain worn enough to catch the chain on entry or exit? The chain should enter the tooth gully without hooking the tip of the tooth, only making contact once it is in. It should remain in contact, spreading the load over multiple pitches before lifting out , again clearing the tip with no grab.

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I realy dont know what was happen with this chain but I think the source of this failure was a workmanship or manufacturing error. It's illogical that some chain last for more than 300000km when other fall to pieces after 80,000km or 185,000km. I did my oil change every 7-8000km as required by manufacturer and I use only mobile1 OW40 (229,5). What's wrong? Could it be my remap? Could it be my camper or trailer holling? Could it be the cooking oil runing?? I dont think so. :huh: Now, chain and sprocket are supposed to be at mercedes-benz rive-sud tomorrow morning. Chain is 97$ and sprocket, 87$. The total cost of my repairs are (at this time), 780$ with the head machining. <_< I still have not found a way to make the exact timing on this engine. :(

Edited by dieselkiki

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It's complete!! And the most beautiful... IT'S RUNNING!!! Yeap! This morning I get the sprocket and the chain (all riveted) to mercedes-benz rive-sud (204$). I show my old chain and sprocket to the shop forman to have a second opinion of what it could happen but he said to me: "Uuuh... you know, when we got that kind of failure, we ship the complete engine to Toronto for expertise." Hmm... ok. <_< Thank you for sharing your opinion! :rolleyes: So, once back at home, I did:- New chain instalation- New sprocket instalation- New chain tentioner and slider- timing- Replace front crank seal- instal front cover with gasket sealer- Instal valves cover- Instal Oil pan with gasket sealer- torque damper pulley- instal A/C, Alt. blet, binder and idler- Instal vacuum pump- Put back the muffler, suspension brackets, bumper- Fill up new oil and replaced oil filter- Fill up new coolant for diesel/aluminium engine and bleed coolant system- Cycle fuel pump 7-8 times- Crank and at second try... it was started- Check the oil pressure light (turned off quickly). - Check arround the engine for fluide leak (no leak). - Performed road test, growling noise during acceleration (muffler into contact with motor mount heat sheild). - instal trailer hitch and back pannelIt's over! The engine is so nervous now! It run so silenty! No more smoke and chain noise! I even didn't know that a OM660 could run without chain noise! It' very impressive! I'm satisfied of the result. It was a "HUGE" job. But it's done! Thank you all for your help and special thanks to Anselmo, shop forman at mercedes-benz rive-sud, for the timing sequence procedure! Really appreciate. See you next time for futher projects! Dominic ;)

Edited by dieselkiki

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