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Michelle21

Comparing L/100km With Other Similar Models?!

49 posts in this topic

I think everyone is REALLY MISSING the point with MODERN engines (forget the diesel smart). They HAVE TO BE CLEAN emissions wise, so that means more equipement and burning as close to possible the perfect ratio and making sure every fuel drop is used up. YOU CAN'T compare to a 24 year old car without a catalytic converter or modern emissions systems (some CDN cars from the mid 80s did not have cats, only US bound ones). Sure some small cars of the 80s did very well on gas, they had crude fuel injection (many without an oxygen sensor even) and they were paper thin cars that weighted very little, a Civic back then would be 2000-2200lbs roughly, now 2600-3000 and up as accessories are added etc.Your smart is driven in the worst possible circumstances, it is urban (you mention you keep up with traffic), your driving in the closed loop all the time with a cold engine (4kms) so it is not reading the oxygen sensors and using as much fuel as possible to get the catalytic converter heated up and oxygen sensors operational (it dumps a good amount of fuel to get things hot as fast as possible, this is what the EPA wants). Did you drive the Honda under the same circumstances-short trips?

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My 23 year old Honda Civic is in the 2,200 lb. category (4-door sedan) and regularly gets in the high 40's / mpg (imp. gal.). It has a cat. converter, fuel injection and oxygen sensor. I often drive it "like I stole it". Gas mileage suffers when I do that of course. Best mileage (naturally) is obtained when driven more sensibly on long, uninterrupted trips. One of the big advantages that a "24 year old car" has over the smart is it's aerodynamics. It also passes the E-test with flying colours every time it is tested. (sample results below) I also noted that the GVWR is listed at 1,420 kg. which translates to 3,130.5 lbs. This is taking a course away from the original post but needed to be answered. The OP was simply asking about our thoughts about the mileage otained and asking how others with similar cars were doing.

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Sorry I did not know that I could toggle that but by doing the Math it comes out to be the same.I realize that the Engine Temperature makes a Difference and its 27 and 33 degrees outside so the Engine is not cold when started and comes quickly up to its operating Temperature even at short Trips. I just moved into the hot and Sunny Okanagan and my quoted Mileage on the other 3cyl Cars was in Prince George, being much cooler.Yes perhaps I put on longer miles instead of 4 maybe 20 or so at a time,still short Trips. The Honda was used in Salmon Arm only in the Winter because it was a junker body wise,so much colder but granted My wife drove it 27km one way daily. So to offset the Temperature for more mileage I think you may break even? I read that the City drive is responsible for the poor mileage,which is understandable,but they also claim 50/55MPG ,so even if there is a difference of 5 miles ,it still is a distance apart from my fuel consumption in the heat of the Summer,only growing worse in the upcoming winter. So if you are getting 5.4l/100 then there must be a problem with my smart and many others like the first poster Michelle for instance ,only M.B. can't find it.M.B. in Kelowna admit that someone else locally, got an upper 30MPG economy. You can be proud of having purchased a Smart that gets you that kind of Mileage. Want to Trade?

You can select what type of units for Fuelly to display, I have mine set for LHK. I took a quick look and there are a few cars in Canada and the US only averaging around 8LHK but the range is anything from low 5LHK to 8LHK. I am willing to bet that the previous car you had went on longer trips and is the main reason for the greater fuel economy, lesser emissions equipment will also be a factor. The mileage you are getting in the smart is not great but falls within what others get from very short trips. If you need/ want better you will need to look into a diesel, hybrid or EV.On a 4km or 10km drive the car does not warm up enough to work optimally. This is not the case in just the smart but all new cars, they all run rich until they are up to operating temperature. As stated above this will only be worse come winter.My average listed in my signature is 5.4LHK in my 2011 451. When it is driven it goes at least 110km, round trip to and from work. My best tank was driving at 60 mph on I-75 in August of this year when I averaged 4.5LHK, I travelled from Seaforth Ontario to Dayton Ohio, 589 km on 26.55L of fuel.Here is the Transport Canada webpage on how fuel ratings are determined. As you will see only your 10km + trips come close to the city conditions.

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So if you are getting 5.4l/100 then there must be a problem with my smart and many others like the first poster Michelle for instance ,only M.B. can't find it.

M-B can't find a problem because there isn't one, no new car short of an EV was designed to only travel a few km per trip. If your trips were similar to the Transport Canada testing or the driving others of us do you would see the same mileage as us from your car.

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No problem with the car ..... Mercedes could not find one ....Here is the deal for you buy it.Just look for it on A*to T*ader

Sell it already!!!

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Update on my latest tank of gas! I did a lot of freeway driving for this tank so this time it is 6.4L/100km.I want to thank all of you for all the information, it was very helpful. I have learnt so much from just asking about this. I am now switching to premium, I had no idea before that Smart cars were built to use Premium. I guess I may have known this if I had been given an updated manual but I was given the old manual which looks to be geared towards diesel...But now I know that my mileage was higher because of the short distance drives to work, and that it doesn't necessarily mean there is something wrong with my car. My only concern was for the car, I love my car and don't want anything to be wrong with it. I also don't want to get stuck somewhere if that was some sort of sign that it needed a check up.Thanks a bunch! Michelle :D

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That's an -OK rate for a city driven 451. If you want to learn how to get that down into the 5s, read up on some of the hypermiling techniques in this sub-forum, for example: link to an older thread.

Basically, treat your brakes as though they are the enemy, try not to use them. When your car is coasting in gear, it burns no fuel. Use this to your advantage. Extreme hypermilers "pulse-and-glide" which uses this fuel cutoff on the the over-run to its maximum effect. But even in normal traffic it is more than possible to knock up to 20% or more off your fuel consumption using some simple driving techniques. Drive your car like you are riding a bike, try to conserve momentum at all costs.

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Thanks Mike. I'll look into that!On a side note, not really geared to this conversation... What is your opinion on snow tires?? I have been told (by a non-car person) that all season tires should be fine for winter. I know our winters aren't as bad as others in Canada. I just would like to hear what others think about winter tires, and if it would be more important with smart cars rather then regular cars... They aren't cheap but if it is a necessity I will buy some.

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Below plus 7 degrees C, all season tires are past their best for traction. I would recommend a harder compund winter tire for the west coast, such as the Continental ones the dealers sell (TS 800). If you get a soft tire like a Bridgestone Blizzak, it will wear out quickly (20,000 km or less?) in the mild winter weather here. The Conti TS 800s should last at least 50K km in this climate.

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All-season technology has vastly improved over the last 5-10 years. Rubber compounds, tread block design, embedded silica traction particles, and summer/winter tread asymmetry have all helped result in a number of true "four season" tires. Some of these handle and grip just as well in snow and on ice as do single-season snow tires, and wear as strongly in the warm season as do single-season summer tires. One such, the Vredestein Quatrac3, even bears the "snowflake" imprint designating it as a fully-performing snow tire.I have been happy with my Hankook V4 (four season) H105 UHP (ultra high performace) all-season tires. I've had them on for two summers and they are hardly worn at all. This winter in Kelowna, I'm keeping them on the car.Bil :sun:

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Hi, I am a newer smart car owner. I've had my car since April this year. I honestly don't know a whole lot about cars, although some of my family are quite good with them. I've been looking around here on this site and also on Feully.com to see what the average L/100km is for the 2011 smart car (so that I can compare with mine). From what I've found so far my car is about 8L/100km. Does this seem high to you guys? I do a lot of city driving and shorter trips. I just want to know if this is normal. Or if it would be a good idea to get my car checked?? There is a good 3000km before my next service is due, but I believe the first one was done at the hyundi dealership where I bought it from.If there are certain things I can check I can get my dad or brother to look into it. My dad checked my oil a month ago and said it was fine. Maybe I should check the tires? I believe the tires were checked at the last service as well.Please let me know what you think,Thanks.

I have a 2011 smart and I have never gotten that sort of poor fuel economy! Are you using at least 94 octane gas in your car? Buy 94 octane at Chevron in Surrey. Drive without your foot pressed down on the gas pedal. By being gentle when accelerating from stop lights, you'll increase your fuel economy.I recently tracked my fuel economy driving from Langley to Seattle and my smart returned am impressive 5.4 litres per 100km on the freeway.Driving in mixed city/freeway driving everyday to work from Coquitlam into Vancouver and back, I average about 5.8 - 6.4 litres per 100km.Change your oil every 10,000km (even though smart claims you don't have to that often), using Mobil One.

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Sorry I have not read all of the thread, but here's what I can share about my 451: ± Six months ago I installed an UltraGauge and my first readings were about 7.x. In the winter and with many short city trips, it went up all the way to 7.45. I have since switched to high octane gas and the average dropped (very, very slowly) to 6.99 a few weeks ago, still, with mostly short trips city driving. Over the last couple of weeks I've done mainly highway (80 to 100 km/hr) and my average has gone down to 6.79. This said, I think the UltraGauge is doing an "all times" average, rather than a tank by tank average, which means that the actual millage I am getting is a bit better on highway driving. I'll keep you posted.

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Over the last couple of weeks I've done mainly highway (80 to 100 km/hr) and my average has gone down to 6.79. This said, I think the UltraGauge is doing an "all times" average, rather than a tank by tank average, which means that the actual millage I am getting is a bit better on highway driving. I'll keep you posted.

I have an UltraGauge in my 2005 CDI and it works well. There is a gauge call InstL and one called AvgL (or something close to that). I run them both on the front page. The InstL will show you your current L/100km and the other will show you the average over all of your tanks since you set it up. There is some other parameters that you MUST setup in order to get the gauges to work accurately. Read the pdf file that is on their website to do that.FWIW...YMMV

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Since I don't own an UltraGauge I don't know what sort of settings it might have. What I did have at one point, was a Jeep that showed overall average from last reset and current (live) mileage. One simple press of a button can reset the overall average to zero so you can do a tank-by-tank evaluation. Perhaps the UltraGauge has this simple option.

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@ Utopiacdi - Yes, I do need to set up the gauge for the readings I want on pages past page 1. I got it as a xmas gift and it was too cold to sit there setting things beyond page 1 at hte time ;)However, I believe I did set all parameters correctly otherwise. That said, it always gives me the "low fuel warning" before the car's own warning even though they are set to the same capacity of fuel left (?).I should set up the "InstL" and do an old fashion 3 tank average reading to see how well they match.

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Hi Lito....Yes, IIRC, you have to set the distance first. I used a measured 10.3 miles using Google Maps drove between two sets of railway tracks. The road was dead-straight, too. After that, set the size of the tank and one other that I can't remember. Anyhow, after that, it does it by itself. Just hold the top menu button everytime your fill-up to tell it you have a full tank and it goes from there. I only use about 10 of the 47 available gauges. My front page has AIT, Engine temp, voltage (alternator), distance to empty, InstL and AvgL. My AvgL is now 3.89l/100. It was stuck for a time at 3.95 and then, with the warmer weather is guess, it started to get better. Good luck....@Leadwing....Hi Ron, yes the average is running all the time and recalculates on the fly. The InstL (real time) gauge is fun to play with as it really shows how much better you can do, mileage wise, with easing up just a little on the pedal.

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I was horrified in a Nissan Altime (2013 version) when I discovered the fuel economy readout is a lifetime readout, and cannot be changed apparently. Have yet to research that online. Guess I'll have to give Don a ScanGauge for Christmas.... Haven't been paying much attention to the diesel FE this summer - but I do know that low 4's are no issue.The 451 would be getting 6 and change. even with bigger tires and a lift.

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Sorry I have not read all of the thread, but here's what I can share about my 451: ± Six months ago I installed an UltraGauge and my first readings were about 7.x. In the winter and with many short city trips, it went up all the way to 7.45. I have since switched to high octane gas and the average dropped (very, very slowly) to 6.99 a few weeks ago, still, with mostly short trips city driving. Over the last couple of weeks I've done mainly highway (80 to 100 km/hr) and my average has gone down to 6.79. This said, I think the UltraGauge is doing an "all times" average, rather than a tank by tank average, which means that the actual millage I am getting is a bit better on highway driving. I'll keep you posted.

But I'm curious about what octane of fuel you use in your smart, are the tyres inflated correctly? Are you using mobil 1 synthetic oil every 10,000km of driving? replacing oil filter? I find if I am not heavy on the gas pedal and take it easy, my smart will easily deliver 5.2-5.4 litres per 100km of combined city/highway driving around Vancouver recently.

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But I'm curious about what octane of fuel you use in your smart, are the tyres inflated correctly? Are you using mobil 1 synthetic oil every 10,000km of driving? replacing oil filter?

To answer your questions... the tires are regular stock at the prescribed pressures; all services done by the book by MB (just 65K km on it); I started by filling up with Shell V-Power 91, and have recently switched to Petro-Canada Ultra 94.However, my reading since started to publish on this thread has gone down to 6.75 l/100km, but, I have also done more highway on the split. Perhaps my short, mostly city driving has to do with my consumption (more than my force on the pedal), or, I just have "one of those cars". I'll keep on posting results here as/if they change ;)

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Have a friend with a 2010 and achieving right around 5.4 LPH. He does a fair amount if driving between Calgary and the interiour and from what I gather right around or just above the posted limit. Top down lots like me (not sure how that affects mileage) and always on premium. Don't know if this is good or bad. He doesn't care. On that same stretch our CDI seems to get around 4 but then again I drive like an old lady.

Edited by John & Angela

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Top down at highway speeds does suck the juice!

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