Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
dalplex

Not Cheap To Fill

35 posts in this topic

Try to find one of 18,000 examples of the all-aluminum 2000-2006 Honda Insight with a good battery, make sure it's running on Bridgestone Potenza RE 92 tires, keep tire pressure up to your maximum/safe compromised level, catch up on ALL maintenance, ensure all underbody shields are in place, keep speed under the legal limit and enjoy the benefits of 3 l/100km consumption.

10,000 Canadians with diesel smarts already enjoy that 3.x L/100 km FE (as low as 2.2) and some of our cars are convertibles too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to have one! There are a handful of grey market imports in the US, but they command a premium price. And diesel usually cost about 10% more at US pumps. Is it also more expensive than premium gas in Canada? Is it easy to find? (It has been over 25 years since my last Toronto visit.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the VINs of 90 diesel smarts that are registered in the USA, there are likely 100 or more there but often what is being sold down there are the clapped out winter beaters from Ontario ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do I have to use summer tire such as contiteco contact ep for the best fuel economy? We tested a diesel soft top yesterday on 401. about 375kms with speed of 110, fueled with 17.6l, for 25$.overall, i got 4.7L/100km.

Edited by dalplex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[summer tires have a totally different compound compared to winter tires, so the short answer is yes. Properly inflated "high mileage" (harder compound for longer lasting tires) summer rubber should get you better mileage.Several members have noticed a significant drop in fuel mileage between summer and winter tires. (the cold weather also contributes to poorer mileage)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FUEL IN UK.....You lot are so lucky, as we in the UK are paying a lot more for fuel, and most of that is government tax (60% duty and VAT, the highest in Europe, and we actually let them away with it :angry: ).Right now (March 2014) my diesel is £1.39 per litre, so that's 3.78 litres to a US gallon (a bit less than a UK gallon) = £5.25, so that's $8.73 (US) per US gallon.TYRES IN UK....We in the UK do not bother much with winter tyres, but we do have a new system of European Union labeling our tyres for three factors...Best Economy of tyre, rated A good down to G bad.Road holding of tyre, rated A good down to G bad.Noise level of tyre, usually from 67db up to 73db, where above 70db is getting noisy.From the EU label, which is a removable paper sticker on the actual tyre or can be read on tyre websites, we can now pick a make and type of tyre that fits the car, not only by price, but also the above three factors, and my priorty is always noise level of tyre, and go for as low a db as I can get for my car.

Edited by Colsmart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4.7L/100km on the 401 is VERY good, considering the speeds involved. I doubt you would be able to improve it by much at 110km/h. Slow down to 90 and see 3.5 or better. If I take mine on a road trip involving major highways I seldom do better then 4.5L due to the speeds involved and trying to cover some ground in a reasonable time, hence I rarely take the smart anywhere and use the Jetta more which does a little worse, about 5-5.5 on the 401 (but its automatic, a manual would do much better). The smart excels at lower speeds...and can corner much faster then most vehicles keeping momentum up/burning less fuel. It is not a great 401/400 commuter car, more like a rural highway driver. There are better choices out there for commuting the faster/jammed highways that will be easier to use/not so slow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The smart is as aerodynamic as a block of wood with a corner chipped. I drive "kinda" fast but this is what I get commonly every week using the Brabus mind you its a bit not stock and has a wide body.

Basically from getting the brabus my routine is the following;

[*]Collingwood to Toronto every Friday and back every Sunday 147km each way (294km)

[*]Then while in Toronto I do 7km running around doing errins

[*]Then from Collingwood I drive to Clarksburg to my office everyday (20.2km each way).

[*]A tank of fuel in my case lasts till Thursday morning so roughly, so 141.4km to and from work.

[*]In total around 442km/22L tank so that's 4.98L/100km.

In the summer time with the 17" Brabus Monoblocks with silly wide tires then my economy takes a serious crap to around 380km a tank (5.8L/100km)

So in reality I'm in the same boat with houseofdiesel with the VW TDI comment. I had a 01 VW beetle TDI (auto) as my daily vehicle going to and from Toronto EVERY day and personally the car wasn't anything special but it did just shy of 500,000km before I sold it still running perfectly and moved onto my next vehicle due to boredom. Thinking of it besides the belts, one bearing and really overdue regular maintenance I never had to bring it in for repairs not even an alternator or starter sadly thinking of it it was the best car I owned. . .

Nowadays my smarts play divide and conquer across Ontario with the guys at work, The coupe my mom stole for in town and my Duramax is my long distance hauler and my 500e and TT sit nice and pretty in the garage while my 300e is the backup.

Edited by dmoonen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live between Barrie and Angus and drive to Eglinton & Dixie, in Mississauga, five days a week. It's about 200km round trip. Normally a tank will last me two and a half trips, or about 500km/tank. In the summer I can get three trips or about 600km if I drive moderately. Dillen is correct about the aerodynamics of the car and when there's a good strong wind, the mileage really suffers. But, I am still getting the low 4's most times in the winter, depending on the conditions. There are a lot of things working against the car in the winter, like 1) colder air is more dense than warm air and it uses more fuel in the winter, 2) winter tyres use more fuel due to rolling resistance and 3) the engine temp is usually below operating temp which causes the computer to run the engine with a richer mixture.All you can do is grin and bear it until the warmer weather comes and then the FE will go back to normal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4) fuel is ''adjusted - thinned'' in the winter to prevent gelling = less power = less mileage

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

    Chatbox
    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More