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Put In The Wrong Gas, Regular Not Premium.

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I inadvertently put in regular gas instead of premium. Should I take it out? Is there a drain plug on the gas tank?

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Adding some octane boost to your tank is an option. Or just use part of the tank of fuel and refill early with 91. Th electronics will take care of running on the lower grade fuel.

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Adding some octane boost to your tank is an option. Or just use part of the tank of fuel and refill early with 91. Th electronics will take care of running on the lower grade fuel.

OK Thanks, Anyone tried PetroCan gas with 94 Octane?

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Virtually all modern engine controls can detect poor gas and compensate for it. Less power and economy, possibly a lot worse. No damage. Just run the tank off and don't make a habit of it. Economy is likely enough worse that your fuel cost is higher on regular gas. But no concerns about blowing the engine.

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Just on a side issue about wrong fuel.

PETROL CAR

If you have a petrol car, and realise that you have started to put diesel in by mistake, then as long as its only a small amount (usually when you have realised your mistake). You must fill your whole tank with petrol to dilute the diesel, and run the car, then keep topping up all the time regulary to a full tank. Do this for a month.

With luck you should have no damage, and the diesel will have been diluted and burned off.

I have made this mistake on a Petrol Honda, and luckly I got away with it.

DIESEL CAR

If you put petrol in a Diesel car, you are knackered. Do not use car, You have to get the fuel drained out.

On most modern pump hoses, the fuel nozzles are sized to stop you using the wrong fuel, but it can still happen, so beware.

My blue 451 diesel Smart Fortwo comes with a black fuel flap (In the UK, black fuel nozzle represents diesel fuel, so its a good reminder), as I do have a petrol car as well. (green fuel nozzle represents petrol fuel).

Blue car black fuel flap....

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Edited by Colsmart

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OK Thanks, Anyone tried PetroCan gas with 94 Octane?

Yes I have for months, and then I was advised here that the difference may not even be noticeable between 91 and 94. I have since run a couple of tanks of 91 and I have to say that there seems to be no apparent difference. In fact, I think that now that the coldest days are behind us, has made a greater mark on my fuel consumption (savings).What I am trying to say is that I get better millage with 91 than I did with 94, but I think that that is more related to weather than it is to gas type.

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Regular gas does have more potential energy than 94, with 91 in the middle. The engine must be happy burning it at normal fuel map though. In the case of an engine designed for high octane, to avoid engine damage it must just mutilate that normal fuel map and you will see bad, possibly terrible mileage. In the case of an engine happy with regular gas which is already burning the fuel at it's normal most efficient map, putting in premium will result in only slightly worse mileage due to the lesser energy content. It will still burn efficiently.Fuel nozzle colours: No system here in Canada. Different brands have their own system. Diesel is green at Chevron, yellow at Husky, etc, no pattern or code.

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Colsmart, I think the black fuel door is coincidental; your car also has the black lower panels. On 2011 and up smarts the lower panels and fuel door are color matched to the body (on Passion models, at least.)

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Colsmart, I think the black fuel door is coincidental; your car also has the black lower panels. On 2011 and up smarts the lower panels and fuel door are color matched to the body (on Passion models, at least.)

Yes, it is just coincidental, as mine is a 2010 and they all came with black fuel door, but it suits my purpose :DIt also says DIESEL on a label behind the fuel door, but is not that obvious, so I rely on the black colour of door, to remind me.

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I run 91 octane................I'll never pay .10 cents more per litre for 94 on a SMART car................

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Regular gas does have more potential energy than 94, with 91 in the middle. The engine must be happy burning it at normal fuel map though. In the case of an engine designed for high octane, to avoid engine damage it must just mutilate that normal fuel map and you will see bad, possibly terrible mileage. In the case of an engine happy with regular gas which is already burning the fuel at it's normal most efficient map, putting in premium will result in only slightly worse mileage due to the lesser energy content. It will still burn efficiently.Fuel nozzle colours: No system here in Canada. Different brands have their own system. Diesel is green at Chevron, yellow at Husky, etc, no pattern or code.

+1

Some engines have higher compression and require higher octane to prevent pre-ignition (knock), which ultimately can cause engine damage. Some engines however, are just timed differently and will not get the proper efficiency with the wrong grade of fuel.

There is no benefit to running higher octane fuel than what your engine is designed for, your performance will actually be hindered because of the lesser potential energy. The reason engines designed for higher octane fuels tend to have higher performance yields is because they compress the fuel more and are able to make greater use of the potential energy. On vehicles without electronic fuel monitoring and mixing, you actually get better performance yields from putting a lower grade in, but at the risk of causing engine damage in the long term.

Just put an ample amount of octane booster in the tank and refill at your usual intervals.

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Just on a side issue about wrong fuel.

PETROL CAR

If you have a petrol car, and realise that you have started to put diesel in by mistake, then as long as its only a small amount (usually when you have realised your mistake). You must fill your whole tank with petrol to dilute the diesel, and run the car, then keep topping up all the time regulary to a full tank. Do this for a month.

With luck you should have no damage, and the diesel will have been diluted and burned off.

I have made this mistake on a Petrol Honda, and luckly I got away with it.

DIESEL CAR

If you put petrol in a Diesel car, you are knackered. Do not use car, You have to get the fuel drained out.

On most modern pump hoses, the fuel nozzles are sized to stop you using the wrong fuel, but it can still happen, so beware.

My blue 451 diesel Smart Fortwo comes with a black fuel flap (In the UK, black fuel nozzle represents diesel fuel, so its a good reminder), as I do have a petrol car as well. (green fuel nozzle represents petrol fuel).

Blue car black fuel flap....

Imgp1073_zpscbfcf36f.jpg

Additional point, some diesels, such as conventional VW diesels can run with up to 30% gasoline (petrol) in the mix. This principle (being a "dry" mix) enables them also to run heating oil as fuel. I assume this is because they have a separate fuel pump lubrication system - typically it is only the oiliness of the fuel that lubricates the pump, and that is why heating oil normally can't be used.

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