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dieselkiki

Biodegradable turbo charger!

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Am I the only one to tought that if the smart car is known as "ecological" car it's could be because some parts on this car seem's to be biodegradable? Especially the turbo charger unit!

Last weekend I replaced the turbo charger on a friend smart's because there was a crack into the exhaust manifold and the exhaust leak make the car got the performance of a dead pig (Or almost...). But when I removed the rear bumper and saw the turbo... WAW!!! What the hell is eating the turbo housing like this? That was looking like "iron termites" who's eating the turbo housing. We can see the treads on the screw who keep the turbo core to the exhaust turbine housing! I'm diesel mechanic for almost 16 years now and I never see something like this before. There is certainly bad material or there's a major error in the desing of the turbo location on this car (road abrasive/water/dust).

Well, I'm still happy to have sold my smart when I saw this kind of failure...

IMG_20150521_130054_zps2mwmtc3k.jpg

If some of you have found a trick to reduce turbo unit corrosion, please don't hesistate to share with us. Thanks!

Have a good night guys!

Dom

Edited by dieselkiki

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My solution is to live where the amount of salt on the road is low, and then I don't drive the smart in winter! My last smart was winter driven but even it looked OK after close to 250K km. If the turbo is that bad, the bodyshell is probably getting weak from rust too.

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Bodyshell don't seem's to be that bad and the undercarriage too. But we must admit that this car wasn't desinged for the Canadian climate for sure. Not for the Québec at least.

When I see that rust and when I look at some mercedes-benz sprinter truck who rust after 2-3 years, I can't imagine what it's could be if the bodypannels of the smarts were steel made!! :nervous:

Edited by dieselkiki
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That is shocking but quite normal.

Mine was in a similar state. Removed turbo with manifold and cleaned it up by electrolysis. The rust then just dropped off. Painted in good quality high temperature paint. Engine subframe, rear axle, sump, front axle component etc get in a similar state when exposed to the salty roads. Body shell is also affected particularly door sills.

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Quite normal? I never had to deal with that kind of rust on any turbo before. I'm working 4-5 days a week on diesel engines: Caterpilar, cummins, navistar, perkins, yanmar etc... and these engines are used on the same salty roads but there are no engines components who rust like this smart turbo charger! Even my previous car (mercede 300SD 1983) who was drive for over 25 winters on the same roads was showing far less rust on turbo and exhaust parts.

It's a shame! I realy think that a part who cost over 2000$ to replaced should be more reliable and factory rustproofed or stainless made. At least, it should be made in the same alloy of other makes of turbos who seem's to have a better rust resistance.

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Rear engined+no under engine shild+hatch back design+salt+heat+moisture+12 years= your problem

Edited by dmoonen
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Cerakote? Hmm, I'll take a look at.

Owner neglect as far as I can tell.

Owner neglect? What kind of maintenance the owner failed to do to have her turbo eat as this? Coated the exhaust manifold or turbo with high temp paint or other coating don't seem's to be in the maintenance guide of the smart fortwo CDI 2006 and I seriously doubt that a mercedes-benz dealer somewhere in this world provide this kind of care on any smart CDI. So Tolsen, ... I think more about a bad conception than an owner neglect.

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I have coated both my turbo and exhaust manifold twice in high temperature paint. First time I used a rather expensive American made VHT paint.

DSC01711.jpg

My freshly coated turbo. Rust was showing after only a few weeks.

A year later I coated turbo and manifold in a cheap British made high temperature paint, black this time. Standing up to the briny roads a whole lot better.

Here is the product:

64927.jpg

http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Painting+%26+Decorating/d150/Spray+Paints/sd2737/High+Temperature+Spray+Paint+500ml/p64927

Of course used stainless steel bolts suitable for immersion in sea water.

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A year ago I weld repaired the holed exhaust for my Yamaha BWS Next Generation 50cc scooter and coated it in above British high temperature paint. Two years later there is still no visible corrosion. Scooter is parked outside at all times fully exposed to the rather wet Scottish weather. Might post a photo later.

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It happens. I once parted out a VW tdi and the turbo was rusted in half, the intake still attached to the engine, the turbine side fell off with the downpipe. It isn't just salt, I believe heat cycling aids the process. I have never had a problem with my own vehicles but I keep them clean and don't over work them. A few of the used smart turbos I have come across were well rusted to the point the exhaust manifold looked thin, engine location is the main reason. It is going to be more and more common as materials get cheaper and salt is applied more often to roads...

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