GRP151

Restrictor Plug or Constrictor Clamp by GRP151

66 posts in this topic

Well after many hours or reading and trying to figure out this Restrictor plug concept that's been used to control the heater box I came up with a simpler way of doing the same thing in a lot less time

In fact it not only takes less time it makes the whole process very easily accomplished.

Take a look boy's and girls and tell me what you think?

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And what were the results?

Did it work?

Were there any problems?

No need to open the system, shove in the reducer, to fill and bleed it.

...and how many hours does it take ?...

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I also tried clamping the pipe. Concluded it does work but difficult to get it right and it has the potential of causing engine overheating damage if circulation is too much constricted.

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Given that the starter solenoid wire and the alternator battery post is near that general area, wouldn't introducing a metal bar run the risk of a major short circuit?

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Given that the starter solenoid wire and the alternator battery post is near that general area, wouldn't introducing a metal bar run the risk of a major short circuit?

Seriously?

You actually think this clamp will magically touch the alternator battery post? :lol2:

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I also tried clamping the pipe. Concluded it does work but difficult to get it right and it has the potential of causing engine overheating damage if circulation is too much constricted.

Ah yes!

And that's why you will see, if you look closely, you cannot constrict it any further than the distance of the 3 stacked nuts on both sides of the clamp.

The flow is adjusted by the number of nuts stacked together.

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Not magical, just running the risk. Its not far fetch to suggest this given that these little cars have rubbing issues with wires.

What you have here is a good alternative, but installing tolsen's plug wasn't hard, maybe messy at best. Either way you'll still have to drop the engine a bit to gain access.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I suspect your referring to the STARTER battery connection being an issue of contacting the metal clamp.

Is that correct?

If the concern is that the bolts could become loose and create a problem use either lock tight on the threads, locking nuts or double nuts to prevent that from happening.

As you can see from the attached images there is considerable distance between any electrical exposure.

You could always secure a split loom around the installation with tie straps for piece of mind also.

Cheers!

P.S. Images taken from my parts motor

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Edited by GRP151
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Make a 9 mm bore restrictor plug and fit at V-piece end of that short hose from thermostat to V-piece and pump. No risk of causing electrical shorts that way.

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Make a 9 mm bore restrictor plug and fit at V-piece end of that short hose from thermostat to V-piece and pump. No risk of causing electrical shorts that way.

Drop the motor, open the coolant system, bleed the system of air, raise the motor and hope you got all the air out after running it for 20 minutes!

Nah!

I think the clamp is far superior to your internal operation

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I also tried clamping the pipe. Concluded it does work but difficult to get it right and it has the potential of causing engine overheating damage if circulation is too much constricted.

Ah yes!

And that's why you will see, if you look closely, you cannot constrict it any further than the distance of the 3 stacked nuts on both sides of the clamp.

The flow is adjusted by the number of nuts stacked together.

I like it!

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No doubt the clamp will work if optimum restricton can be achieved.

When I orginally designed the restrctor plug I tried out a dozen different orifice sizes of which the 9 mm one was the most promising. Much later I found 9 mm is also the orifice size used in the built in restrictor of the Smart 450 petrol thermostat.

Main problem with the clamp is the difficulty getting right restriction and making sure there no circulation blockage. There must be a minimum circulation in the bypass to ensure hot spots in engine are avoided.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Well I'm pretty sure the constrictor clamp image is self explanatory. You stack the nuts to control the flow. Less nuts less flow.

It seems pretty obvious to me on how it works and even how well it works.

If you have the time to machine a piece of plastic to shove inside the coolant line that's up to you. I prefer to focus on other efforts

Opening up the coolant system and playing around to bleed it, seems like a waste of time to achieve the same results.

But who am I to say that about people who paint their drive shafts yellow or make a front bumper like I did.

To each his own!

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Edited by GRP151
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I had made an enquiry about this some time ago.

My question and subsequent responses start at my Post #606.

http://clubsmartcar.com/index.php?showtopic=22515&hl=thermostat&page=13

Yes but the design posted is flawed. No way to regulate it perfectly as per the stacked nuts approach. That is why it was scrutinized.

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I had made an enquiry about this some time ago.

My question and subsequent responses start at my Post #606.

http://clubsmartcar.com/index.php?showtopic=22515&hl=thermostat&page=13

Yes but the design posted is flawed. No way to regulate it perfectly as per the stacked nuts approach. That is why it was scrutinized.

What size bolt and nuts? 1/4" UNC?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I had made an enquiry about this some time ago.

My question and subsequent responses start at my Post #606.

http://clubsmartcar.com/index.php?showtopic=22515&hl=thermostat&page=13

Yes but the design posted is flawed. No way to regulate it perfectly as per the stacked nuts approach. That is why it was scrutinized.

What size bolt and nuts? 1/4" UNC?

I decided to use 1/4" x 1 1/4" UNC stainless steel bolts with those aluminum plates ( didn't want any galvanic corrosion)

You can use what ever fits in Metric or SAE

Edited by GRP151
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Surely thickness of nuts in nut stack will affect constricton so any nut size won't work as intended.

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I found the depth of constriction to be between 5/8 to 3/4 of an inch to reduce the flow and provide adequate flow to warm up to 3 blobs.

therefore what ever size of nuts or plane washers will work to achieve that height should do.

Edited by GRP151
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Excellent post GRP151!

This is certainly a lot easier restricting the coolant flow than using Tolsens restrictor.

Opening up the system and bleeding the air pocket out of the coolant line is a real pain!

Great post!

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On 2/29/2016 at 10:49 AM, GRP151 said:

Well after many hours or reading and trying to figure out this Restrictor plug concept that's been used to control the heater box I came up with a simpler way of doing the same thing in a lot less time

In fact it not only takes less time it makes the whole process very easily accomplished.

Take a look boy's and girls and tell me what you think?

CC1.JPG

CC2.JPG

CC3.JPG

CC4.JPG

CC5.JPG

 

I can't believe this will work, if it does its brilliant! I was just about to order the restrictor plug but this makes the job a lot easier than I thought! Has anyone else tried this?

 

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On 3/1/2016 at 0:52 PM, tolsen said:

Make a 9 mm bore restrictor plug and fit at V-piece end of that short hose from thermostat to V-piece and pump. No risk of causing electrical shorts that way.

 

What does that mean?...." and fit at V-piece end of that short hose from thermostat to V-piece and pump" The V-piece is above the pump isn't it? How can you attach the restrictor there? Did you mean to say "at the " pump?

I'm assuming that was what was meant.

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You disconnect short bypass hose from V piece and push restrictor into that barb, then reconnect hose. 

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2 hours ago, Ritchie said:

 

I can't believe this will work, if it does its brilliant! I was just about to order the restrictor plug but this makes the job a lot easier than I thought! Has anyone else tried this?

 

Flow area of restrictor is 60 mm2. Gap inside the flattened hose must therefore be rather small about 1.4 mm. You will need to make sure you have a minimum gap or engine may suffer damage due to hot spots caused by inadequate coolant circulation. 

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Flow area in this constricted hose is far too large and will not work at all. 

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I estimate above flow area no less than 300 mm2. No way that will have any effect at all. 

 

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