RobCDI

Best warm up procedure?

14 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

Im thinking for this winter how would be best to warm the engine up. Firstly, Should I let it idle to warm up or start driving as soon as the oil is flowing(say 20 seconds after start)? The car has a diesel, the cold burn at idle will cause a lot of soot buildup and it will dirty the engine(not good). So after the car has run for about 30 seconds you should drive gently at low rpm, low engine load. The problem here is the car is a turbo so if you use low rpm(1600) and actually want to drive normal speeds the turbo will have to spool up quite high to give you power(probably not great with freezing temp oil and components). If I drive with higher rpm/low boost(for extra power) I get more engine wear.

 

I would predict that the best starting routine in winter would be to let the car run for 30 seconds, slowly drive away going gentle on the throttle, stay around 2000 rpm and try to avoid spooling the turbo too much. This should be the kindest start on your engine.

Edited by RobCDI

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If possible, use a block or oil pan heater on a timer.  It tends to warm up the oil which transfers some of that heat (albeit, not much) to the turbo as well as the engine oil.  Low RPM for until the temperature gauge shows at least "one blob".  Gradually increasing the RPM and load can be then applied.  This is in theory only ....... others who are more "in the know" may chime in with different opinions.

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0W40 should still flow to -40 or colder.

 

If you can preheat the oil or block, that would be the best practice in minus temperatures.

 

When below zero my cdi would idle as long as it took to clean the snow and ice off, never plugged in.  I would keep it under 3k rpm until there was some heat in the engine.  Then I would just drive normally.

 

In the 451, unless it is minus 10 or more I do not idle it for very long, clear car then start.  If you have heated seat make use of them, the more heat you can keep in the engine, the better your winter FE..

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I just started mine and drove. No problems at all in 188,000 km, running nothing but premium diesel with occasional fuel conditioner additive.

 

Most engines, and diesels in particular, don't really warm up very much at idle. They need to be under load. I never liked mine idling very long, getting zero MPG.

Edited by darren

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On 9/21/2017 at 7:51 PM, Leadwing said:

If possible, use a block or oil pan heater on a timer.  It tends to warm up the oil which transfers some of that heat (albeit, not much) to the turbo as well as the engine oil.

 

Good suggestion Ron. Personally, I've been using an oil pan heater for 3 winters on my '05 450 CDI. I find it makes a big difference. It only warms up marginally faster, but it starts considerably easier &quicker on the coldest mornings. Always starts on the first cycle of the glow plugs. Plugged in for 2-3 hours first thing in the morning is all it takes.

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The cable for the built in pan heater is hard to find and not cheaper than $30. You can buy "glue on" pan heaters for $30, Anyone know where i can get cheap cables or should i just go with the glue on unit?

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Do you have a 2005 or 2006?

The reason I ask is because the 2006 came with a ''block heater''.

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2 hours ago, RobCDI said:

The cable for the built in pan heater is hard to find and not cheaper than $30. You can buy "glue on" pan heaters for $30, Anyone know where i can get cheap cables or should i just go with the glue on unit?

If anyone needs a cable for the block heater, I've got one which is no longer required...

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19 hours ago, TheHandyHobbit said:

 

It only warms up marginally faster, but it starts considerably easier &quicker on the coldest mornings. Always starts on the first cycle of the glow plugs. Plugged in for 2-3 hours first thing in the morning is all it takes.

 

Ah, I sure don’t miss those “three glow plug cycle” mornings!

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We had a few 1 deg c mornings last week. I get a free bus pass so i will just take the bus for my 10 min commute on the really cold mornings. Pm'd lebikerboy. 

 

Its a 2006, the oem "blockheater" is an oil pan heater. I had to take it off when I took off my oil sump. I cleaned it and put it back and it all looks in good condition.

 

Something like this $9 cad would get the oil nice and warm. I used one on my first gen mx5's 1.6L gas and it got the oil nice and warm even in -35c.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/110V-175W-Heater-Pad-Silicone-Oil-Pan-Sump-Tank-Pre-Heater-Car-Engine-Protection/322118678373?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D47507%26meid%3D18ef2ac92efa4bd58e07554698c7d5b1%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D252637034220&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851

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3 hours ago, tolsen said:

Getting stinking cold already is it?

Here in south western Ontario, it was a 32C day (39 with humidity factored in)

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Posted (edited) · Report post

ive never had trouble with mine

 

one of the first things i did to it though was all new glow plugs and reamed out the passages before install...

 

car has always started from 30C down to -30C with no problems...i dont recall ever even needing to double cycle the glows

 

i do not have any block heater

Edited by LooseLugNuts

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Plug it in, essential for long life. Add a stick on oil pan heater too (under $100). You could also add a real coolant heater, 750-1500 watts, then it will start at operating temp after an hour (this is very nice!). Again under $100 and available at cdn tire.

Start it, let it idle while you buckle up and turn the lights and radio on, run it a minute. Then SLOWLY take off (the hardest part on these cars is take off, it requires near 100% load). Short shift and use very little throttle until you start getting blobs on the temp gauge, I run mine at 1400-1600 when cold. Never use the turbo when cold, the thermal expansion is too great. Try not to use the heater, crack the windows a cm to vent the moisture. 

This for long life, not 100k but a million (if possible). Being gentle on a cold engine is essential to keep it going "forever"

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