ACSTECH

Mysterious coolant leak

51 posts in this topic

Our Bosch CP1 pump:

 

pump.jpg

Note there is no bolted on pressure regulator.

 

Generic exploded view of our pump:

Bosch_CP1_Expl_View.jpg

 

Pressure regulator is item 6.  Our engine has pressure regulator built into left side of common rail

Cut out solenoid for third pumping element is item 32.  Parts numbering in above diagram appears somewhat cocked up in that many different seals have same item number.  I assume reason is one time in the past all these items used to come in a particular kit from Bosch.

 

Here is Smart's repair kit for the pump:

A6600780080.jpg

.

In my experience it is only the small rubber o-rings that fail:

DSC03070.jpg

I therefore believe you may as well just fit 6 Viton o-rings of the right size to sort out your pump.

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All parts numbered 7 used to come in same Bosch kit.  This is still the case now except the rotary seal is no longer in the seal kit and must be bought separately. 

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It takes me two hours to change all 6 o-rings on the 3 stub connector pipes between heads and pump body.  Most time is spent cleaning and preventing dirt contaminating fuel system.  This therefore also means dressing up in clean boiler suit, no spitting or dribling of chewing tobacco on parts, clean hands, clean tools and clean work surfaces before start of work.

 

Removing pump from engine can often take several days, not necessarily working full time but to allow penetration fluid to enter seized bolts.  Getting all parts back where they were is always quicker than dismantling.  I grease bolts and nuts prone to seizure.

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o ring.png

 

I can't find my Bosch CP1 seals just now.  Obviously mislaid as usual.  In May 2012 I purchased a box full of Viton o-rings to rebuild these pumps.  Invoice states 1 x 2mm Section 4.5mm Bore VITON Rubber O-Rings, hence 2 mm section, 4.5 ID and 8.5 mm OD, or A = 4.5 mm and B = 8.5 mm.

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I noticed mine was leaking by the yellow slushy snow below it after running for a while (-40 c) while cleaning off the vehicles. I thought it was a coolant leak because the drips hanging under the engine looked blue like the coolant. I figured the yellow was the coolant reacting with the asphalt on the driveway. Couldn’t figure out why coolant was over there (hence the thread title) figured it out after finally taking a sample in a dish and trying to ignite it.

life got busy with a new bay and all and this job went to the back burner. Hoping to start Saturday and finish Sunday. Driving the truck to work and back Monday to Friday is costing me $170 (cad) a week compared to the $50 with my smart. Hope to be done soon.

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Some pumps attempted repaired by mechanics or owners had other leaks and issues but these were caused by the clumsy repairers. 

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I've been handed for rebuild stripped down pumps in cardboard boxes or shopping bags with parts often missing.  Have also seen mechanics attempting seal replacement with pump in situ. Have so far never seen that being successful.   

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Everything is apart however the pump does not want to pull off the engine....

is it a tight fit onto the side of the engine? I am about to use a piece of wood and dead blow hammer to loosen it but I don’t know how it is attached. All 3 bolts are out, 2 Input fuel lines and rigid high pressure line all removed.

Edited by ACSTECH

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On 2/13/2018 at 4:21 PM, smart142 said:

That's a tight fit to the engine block so use lots of penetrating oil and then wiggle it out.  Have patience and good luck!

 

Be gentle!

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Posted (edited) · Report post

DSC03066.jpg

 

The o-ring sometimes locks pump in its bore in cylinder head. Remember to grease this o-ring when refitting pump. 

Note how I have sealed fuel ports to avoid  contamination. 

 

 

 

Edited by tolsen

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probably any kind would be ok

 

it comes in contact with engine oil and blow by gas so anything is probably safe

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Purpose of greasing o-rings is to ease assembly and prevent damage to o-rings.  Use normal mineral lithium grease when assembling pump.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

 

I always use cheap supermarket penetration oil to clean parts when working on diesel pumps.  Less than £2 for a 400 ml spray can here.

 

Grease is good for the o-rings in the pump.  Eases assembly and less chance of damaging o-rings.  Also perfect for ensuring the wee metal seal rings stay in right position when assembling. 

 

Of course compressed air is also handy.

Edited by tolsen
Removed reference to GRP151 as his posts apprear to have gone.

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Ok, time to install the pump. Been working on fitting it in for about 2 hours. How do you line up the tabs? I tried putting the piece with two tabs onto the crank first and onto the pump. No luck either way. Frustration rising....

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Easy compared to conventional diesel pumps that had to be timed. 

Turn pump by hand so the flats on its shaft appear to align with cam shaft then insert pump into engagement. Then turn pump to align bolt holes and screw in bolts. 

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Important point:

 

Make sure to fit shaft coupling between camshaft and pump. Without this the engine won’t start. 

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I finally got it. It took me 2 hours to align it and have it go together.

I have been working on aircraft for 11 years, this has by far been the hardest thing to assemble.

Tomorrow is final assembly and start up.

Thanks for all the assistance.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

(Insert explicit language here)

Engine code P0003

the plug for the solenoid(?) on the high pressure pump wouldn’t connect. It kept on popping off. Used a set of pliers to bridge across the back of it and press it on until it connected. Would this be the issue? The car starts (after more cranking than normal) and runs but has this code.

all your expert advise please.

Edited by ACSTECH

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Tolsen will have an answer once he awakes (he's in the UK). Sorry, I have always kept my smarts no more than 120,000 kms and have yet to experience such issues. But the answer will be here for you!

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I have never seen P0003 but suspect it relates to open circuit in third pumping element cut off. 

Its connector sits upside down hence have collected dirt since 2005 or 2006. You need to clean the connector and socket on pump. I would have thought that should be obvious. 

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Both the connector and plug of the solenoid were cleaned. Contact cleaner and dielectric grease. Car only has 52,000km.

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Fixed, wire was degraded along the line from the offload valve. Repair and run all good.

 

Thanks to all the who helped along the way. I really appreciate the help.

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