Willys

Winter Driving in a SMART...?

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You pay cycling ins.  ?   I haven't heard of this here, do we also have it? Interesting, that is for when a speeding cycle slides into me at an intersection during a whiteout obviously...lol

 

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Yes, I pay cycling insurance.  A surprising number number do.  3rd party cover comes free with membership of the 2 biggest UK cycling organisations.

 

My insurance gives me £10 million liability cover, comprehensive legal cover, and also covers me for instructing purposes as well.  I can see why it isn't obligatory (you're more likely to be killed by a pedestrian knocking you over than a cyclist, and no one champions compulsory insurance for walking), but with the mileage I do and the increasing number of prats out there I'm happy to pay the £55 odd a year.

 

Coming back to topic, the average UK motorist is woefully Ill prepared for bad weather, despite us getting it every year.  It's nice to see you Canadian folk (and English ex pats) taking it more seriously.  We had a 29" fall locally here in March, and I'm the only one in the street who had 3 peaks rated boots on my car.  It's often suggested that as climate change interferes with the North Atlantic Drift that out summer's will get hotter and drier, and our winters  wetter and colder, but you can be the bone idle lazy masses still won t prepare themselves for winter on the road.  Still, keeps me busy as a SAR volunteer.

Edited by Chopper
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5 hours ago, Chopper said:

Yes, I pay cycling insurance.  A surprising number number do.  3rd party cover comes free with membership of the 2 biggest UK cycling organisations.

 

My insurance gives me £10 million liability cover, comprehensive legal cover, and also covers me for instructing purposes as well.  I can see why it isn't obligatory (you're more likely to be killed by a pedestrian knocking you over than a cyclist, and no one champions compulsory insurance for walking), but with the mileage I do and the increasing number of prats out there I'm happy to pay the £55 odd a year.

 

Coming back to topic, the average UK motorist is woefully Ill prepared for bad weather, despite us getting it every year.  It's nice to see you Canadian folk (and English ex pats) taking it more seriously.  We had a 29" fall locally here in March, and I'm the only one in the street who had 3 peaks rated boots on my car.  It's often suggested that as climate change interferes with the North Atlantic Drift that out summer's will get hotter and drier, and our winters  wetter and colder, but you can be the bone idle lazy masses still won t prepare themselves for winter on the road.  Still, keeps me busy as a SAR volunteer.

10 Million coverage...what the hell can you do to get sewed for that amount in England...damn!...????   And i thought it was bad over here copying the USA...lol.   

Now back to the cold and stuff....I can remember having to drive around the fields on the farm in the late 70's searching for the sheep in he landrover with meaty tires on, snow up to the floor boards in the Midlands....lol....We had to dig them out of the drifts like mushrooms!  Or loose them....you are completely correct about the English being idiotic about snow...lol....a few mm can shut the country down to a stand still I know...and as you say seeing as they are getting more and more snow each year, they still do not recgognize the importance of snow tires...carzy I know... But, we are going the opposite way, dropping good snow digging rubber for more slat and salt brime which rots our expensive vehicles and moving towards all season tires at best!   Now who's the crazy ones...?  At any sign of frost, you can see lines, tracks sprayed down the roadways where they have dropped this salt mixture in hopes of clearing the ice or limiting the formation of ice. I guess they don't have to worry about replacing their vehicles like the general population does almost every 5 years.   BUT after saying that, the manufacturers are using far better materials in the body sheet metals and they are lasting far longer, too bad the rest doesn't? We are still recycling cars far too soon to keep the auto industry alive and kicking.  

The best way to keep a vehicle intact is to basically dip it in a good sticky greasey oily solution for a week before the summer is over  so it runs everywhere, then drive it down a gravel; road to get the dust to clamp it dwon tight to the vehicle so you don't rub your clothing against it everytime you climb aboard...lol.  My sludge of choice is RustCheck and axle grease....one runs everywhere and the other sits firmly where you put it. Every notice the areas around a "U" joint where you used to insert grease and it's flown out over the years, it's like brand new material under all that oversprayed grease....proves a point imho.  But unless you are what 50, you've never seen a grease nipple or a "U" joint, lol.

 

 

Now where were we....oh yes....winter driving.....damn what a slippery subject to stay on...lol

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I make my own Redneck Waxoyl.

 

Half a kilo of paraffin wax flakes.  Dissolve in 2 litres of white spirit.  May take a few weeks of occasional stirring and letting it soak somewhere warm.  Once it's all dissolved you have a runny, gloopy liquid a bit like semolina pudding (yuck!).  Mix in 2 litres of light oil, or a light grade engine oil, and stir thoroughly.  Decant into a garden sprayer - I use the manual kind you pump up by hand.

 

Pick a warm day, and further warm up the mixture in a bucket of hot water.  Spray under the car, on suspension components, into chassis rails and members, into doors and cavities.  It'll be a bit drippy for a day or two, but the white spirit will quickly evaporate out, leaving a soft waxy covering, that will bleed and self heal over any chips etc.  It's cheap, maybe even free if you're clever (you can grind up candles in a cheese grater if you don't want to spend any money), and gives a much thicker and more effective covering than shop bought waxoyl.  I reckon it'd resist even a Canadian winter.

 

perhaps not the most environmentally friendly ungent, but its a lot less damaging than the environmental cost of permaturely manufacturing a new car to drive around in.

Edited by Chopper
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I still have some huge actual cans of Waxoyl that I carried back from Scotland as cabin luggage in the 1990s.  Waxoyl is not available here in Canada.  Imagine that, Waxoyl in an airliner!!  Using it on my Peugeot 404C at the moment.  Love the stuff.

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Back in the Jeep restoring days , we wanted to make our own also, tried so many different concoctions we lost track of what was the best...so we bought a fresh 4X8 sheet of steel, washed the oils off it, sectioned it off into 1 foot squares, put a drop of every recipe we had and then one of crown and one of Rust check....we wanted to see which would run the best and then also last a full winter sitting outside at a 45 degree angle without running like water.  None ran like water too sticky....all our mixtures didn't run much at all or spread much......the only real winners for what we were looking for were the two commercial ones, go figure. So much so that they almost covered the entire square foot  area they were put in but the tie spring had come around.  Crown wasn't as good as Rust check . Rust check covered I would say 90 % of that square foot area and we put one drop directly in the centre of each square.......most of our homemade what we thought was great maybe covered a few inches before coming to a full stop. Sure they stopped the rusting but you didn't get the coverage that we saw from the two commercial drops.....truely amazing to say the least!  It stopped us dead thinking we could compete with the big guys even for our own uses.  What it costs to either buy a few cans of rust check or crown, never seen crown in a spray can actually......as I haven't looked for it.....I went for the best one straight off the mark. So for less than $100 back in the day this is christ 35 years ago almost now, damn!   You would get everything soaked and then some by this creeping jiuce. After restoring a vehicle and you still want to drive it tear round you wanted it to work well. Restoring vehicles isn't a cheap hobby.....as anyone who's done it right and they will tell you so. ((.9 % of them won't concider driving them in the winter anyway because of this....but...hey we also off roaded ours.
I get every new vehicle rust checked for 2 years profesionally, then I touch it up yearly after that. I have never had a vehicle rust out since doing it this way.  That is I bought them from new. I have bought I think 5 new cars so far....never again.....just not worth it.....it's nice but not worth it. So if money is an issue as it will possibly be....look after your expensive new toys. A few hundred bucks for 2 years and  lets say $40 a year after that will protect them for a long time. To each their own.....

As I said before, the best way and cheapest way was to simply smear axle grease, marine quality using a paint brush and your hands onto any and all metal surfaces under the vehicle...but it didn't protect inside the nuibody sections, that's why we changed. 

So enjoy your home made soups and mystery juices, I'll stick with that red can of rust check......lol
I will say the black goop Glenn uses sticks like shit to a blanket and is just as disgusting to work near!....lol.

 

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Isn't it moderately popular in the US for folk to have the underside of their trucks sprayed with oil?

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Yes in Canada for sure....we used to simply spray used engine oil mixed with old tranny oil etc etc, anything to coat the underneath to help slow the constant rust issues and back in the day a vehicle would rot out completely in less than 5 years!  My first car was swiss cheese!  a collector car now, but totally rotten but someone made what we call bondo, it sticks to anything and goes hard so you can form it to make a new car...and we did!   That car had more cardboard and carpet holding bondo together than it has steel!  I was 16 and knew nothing and don't ever claim i did...lol...but it was a solid looking car and painted well....large metalic brown...lol...I might have broken even when I sold it..maybe? Just for the materials. The new owner came back angry as hell after the first winter after if simply fell apart...lol. But...I've always been a bit bigger than the average guy, thanks to farm work. and weights....lol. So no worries.  
Back to the oil spraying, yes, still goes on away from official eyes of course, enviromental police get upity about it etc....can't be harmfull or non commercial now a days.....but yes we spray the hell out of our vehicles every fall......you see plenty of oil dripping vehicles sitting at the malls..lol. Best thing to do is find a good gravel road with plenty of dust on it and drive it a few times directly after getting car sprayed...slows the dripping a bit.....Rust Check is my oil of choice, it works and works well...to each their own...it'll soon be time, got to do it before the hot weather leaves for good and before the rains start or most will wash off before it creeps into every nook and cranny.  My daily Smart Glenn coated the daylights out of, so much so everytime i touch it to look at something to do toit I get covered in black oily crap , it's seriously nasty stuff, but for what it's made for does a great job, just nasty stuff to deal with. I have washed most of it off in the maintenance areas by now.....lol...sorry Glenn....it's still stuck to areas of my driveway even after the pressure washer  to get it off...lol...so it's good stuff...

 

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My '89 Honda Civic will be 30 years old in two months and there is no sign of rust anywhere!  I am the original owner and I bought it in September of 1988 when it first hit the dealership.

 

I went directly to the Krown Rust protection centre and had it sprayed.  Yes, it does drip for a few days, but that eventually leaves no sign of ever being on the driveway.  When the car is being serviced, the mechanics usually comment about how easy it is to work on because no nuts or bolts are rusty, but rather, just like new.

 

It is a yearly spray and as long as the car is re-sprayed every year, the warranty is still good.  The guarantee is that they will fix and re-spray any area that does rust........forever.

Honda Civic with Trailer.jpg

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I'm sure my spare will look like this one day...lol.  Stripped to the bone and then what will i do...lol.  Don't tempt me with more power for one of them.....just for shits and giggles, I wonder what a far stronger engine would feel like....lol.    Dare I utter the word BUSSA...lol

My other thought is make the doors removable for these hot sticky days. But make them workable units when installed back on.....damn that pic brings back restoration days, my problem is, they never go back to a stock form...lol..I always look for making them either better or more useful.

 

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The impression I'm getting here is that within their limits the Fortwo handles the snow fairly well? I remember the Strength-Through-Joy wagen was pretty good in the snow, aided by the weight of the motor over the driver rear wheels, and I guess it applies to the Fortwo as well.

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5 hours ago, Chopper said:

The impression I'm getting here is that within their limits the Fortwo handles the snow fairly well? I remember the Strength-Through-Joy wagen was pretty good in the snow, aided by the weight of the motor over the driver rear wheels, and I guess it applies to the Fortwo as well.

 

Yes Chopper ....... within the limits of ground clearance, the smart is not too shabby in the snow.  Of course using the original tyres which have a "summer" pattern and compound is pretty useless.  Winter tyres are a MUST if the car is going to see any snow or cold weather at all.

 

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i never had much problem except when it gets piled up at intersections ...and when its more than 6 inches of fresh stuff or more than 3 inches of the sticky heavy wet stuff

 

sticky heavy wet stuff is the worse...you cant get going because as soon as a tire slips it applies the brakes

 

other than that the thing has amazing traction on packed snow

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