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Guest dee001

Used Smart ForTwo engine common problems

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Hello.I am a Smart ForTwo lover and a new to this forum. I do not own a Smart yet, but in the begining I would like to buy a used one.I have a serious question.I am located in Greece, Europe, and here a brand new Smart ForTwo costs around 10-12,000 euros.However, you can find a used one aged 1 to 6 years from 3000 up to 6000 euros.Many people told me that these cars, although they have an efficient economic engine and good drive quality on the road, after a certain amount of mileage, their egine presents some sort of damage, cannot function properly anymore, and that is why the used ones are available in such low prices. To repair them you need to change the engine, so you are adviced to buy a brand new instead. Is this true? I cannot believe this, as I trust the brand very much, and I am looking forward to buy a used Smart ForTwo.Thanks

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Welcome to the club!We have had the smart here for a little over 2 years so there are not huge numbers of used ones on the market.All the Canadian smarts are diesel and these seem to be a robust engine. However we have had a number of turbo failures, probably because we have an inferior fuel when compared to Europe.I would recommend that you look for a used cdi. Good luck!

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Do not buy a 600 cc petrol version; those engines are definitely fragile and they are what gave the smart its reputation for weak engines. The turbos are prone to failure, and one of the three cylinders seems to lose compression easily, usually following the cracking of the exhaust manifold and consequent leaning out of the fuel mixture on one of the cylinders.The 700 cc petrol version is a lot more robust, from the 2003 model year (cars with ESP) until the present time.The diesel engine is the only one that is sold in Canada, and it is by far the most reliable fortwo engine.When buying any used car, there remains risk, depending upon how the previous owner treated the car. Two things to watch for are oil level (never more than half full is best) and whether the driver lets the car idle for ~30 s after driving, which would protect the turbocharger.If I were buying, I would buy a new cdi.

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Two things to watch for are oil level (never more than half full is best)

Uh, say what? Care to clarify, Mike?

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Cars with blown EGR valves, blocked intercoolers and blown turbos often have had oil levels at or above the "full" mark. TPM's ace smart mechanic, Jeff, NEVER fills them to more than halfway up the stick, for that reason.

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So you are saying half way down the dipstick marks (0.5L) not 1.4L total ;)Slightly underfilled, not half full, to anybody reading it quickly. :smirk:

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Yeah half full on the stick, smartie pants ;)

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