Club smart car

Why is this ad here?

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Spark Plug Replacement, How much does this cost at MB?
shakey
post Sep 2 2009 - 07:15 AM
Post #1





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 123
Joined: Jul 2nd, 08
From: Cambridge
Member No.: 6,123



Good Day Everyone,

I have a 2008 Passion with 37,000 km on it. I am going in for an A service next week and in my service manual it says that the spark plugs should be replaced at 45,000 km. Has anyone had MB do this for them, and if so what is the cost associated with this replacement?

Thanks in advance,

Shakey
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Talgas
post Sep 2 2009 - 06:12 PM
Post #2





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 77
Joined: Mar 10th, 08
From: Edmonton, AB
Member No.: 5,569



This is what Mercedes will charge you at Weber Motors in Edmonton, should be somewhat similar where you are. The spark plugs themselves were $14.72 each (a total of $44.16 just for the plugs) and the labour was $70.20. So the grand total was $120.08 with tax. I figure next time I'll probably scout out the plugs somewhere else (they should definitely be cheaper) and do it myself if it isn't too awkward to access the plugs in the engine compartment. If you find plugs somewhere else post the brand/price and your thoughts regarding them. I'm sure there are others with the same questions. Hope that helps and thanks.
Craig


--------------------
2008 Passion Coupe: Blue w/ Silver Tridion, Fog Lights/Pods, Scangauge and Area451 Cruise
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
shakey
post Sep 3 2009 - 08:12 AM
Post #3





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 123
Joined: Jul 2nd, 08
From: Cambridge
Member No.: 6,123



QUOTE (Talgas @ Sep 2 2009 - 06:12 PM) *
This is what Mercedes will charge you at Weber Motors in Edmonton, should be somewhat similar where you are. The spark plugs themselves were $14.72 each (a total of $44.16 just for the plugs) and the labour was $70.20. So the grand total was $120.08 with tax. I figure next time I'll probably scout out the plugs somewhere else (they should definitely be cheaper) and do it myself if it isn't too awkward to access the plugs in the engine compartment. If you find plugs somewhere else post the brand/price and your thoughts regarding them. I'm sure there are others with the same questions. Hope that helps and thanks.
Craig


Thanks for the reply Craig. I'm not much of a DIY guy but I'll see next Friday what they plan on charging me, I'll post the price after.

Thanks again.

Shakey
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Fred J
post Sep 3 2009 - 09:17 AM
Post #4





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 1,156
Joined: May 22nd, 05
Member No.: 4



I would be more concerned by the frequency of the replacement.

Today's plugs last far longer than the Champion Plugs of old did.

I have a Suzuki V-6 with 196,000 on the original plugs and a Ford F150 with 100,000+ on them.

No indications so far that they need replacing.

Conservatively I wouldn't even think about the Smart ones for at least 100,00 - 150,000 kms.

If a plug eventually fouls up or misfires, it is not something that will let you down on the road, therefore if its not broken, don't fix it.

In due course a Tech's work station probably will have a box full of used, perfectly good plugs.

Just my opinion from some one who refuses to waste money needlessly.

This post has been edited by Fred J: Sep 3 2009 - 09:19 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
shakey
post Sep 3 2009 - 09:38 AM
Post #5





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 123
Joined: Jul 2nd, 08
From: Cambridge
Member No.: 6,123



QUOTE (Fred J @ Sep 3 2009 - 09:17 AM) *
I would be more concerned by the frequency of the replacement.

Today's plugs last far longer than the Champion Plugs of old did.

I have a Suzuki V-6 with 196,000 on the original plugs and a Ford F150 with 100,000+ on them.

No indications so far that they need replacing.

Conservatively I wouldn't even think about the Smart ones for at least 100,00 - 150,000 kms.

If a plug eventually fouls up or misfires, it is not something that will let you down on the road, therefore if its not broken, don't fix it.

In due course a Tech's work station probably will have a box full of used, perfectly good plugs.

Just my opinion from some one who refuses to waste money needlessly.


There has been no indication of a bad plug at all. I was just going by what the manual says for replacement. If I refuse to have them replaced (I could use the cash in my pocket right now) would this void my warranty?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Fred J
post Sep 3 2009 - 09:45 AM
Post #6





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 1,156
Joined: May 22nd, 05
Member No.: 4



"There has been no indication of a bad plug at all. I was just going by what the manual says for replacement."

Precisely my point, however you expressed it far more succinctly.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ianjay
post Sep 3 2009 - 09:47 AM
Post #7





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 1,205
Joined: May 31st, 06
From: Queen&Pape, Toronto
Member No.: 977



Greetings:

On the other hand, if M-B recommends replacing the plugs and you elect not to, you might risk having a warranty claim denied somewhere down the road. Maybe replacing the gas engines is just a whole lot cheaper than the diesels, but for such tiny little things (smart engines) they sure cost big bucks.

Plugs do last much longer now with cleaner fuels, precise manufacturing methods, and sophisticated electronic fuel injection systems. Plugs can stay in for ridiculously long times, but sometimes those plugs get very attached to the cylinder heads in which they are installed. My guess is that replacing the plugs a few times, even at M-B rates, will prove more cost effective than repairing or (gasp!) replacing a ruined cylinder head.

If you don't plan on keeping the car, ignore the doomsayers like me. Preventative maintenance usually benefits the next owner of the vehicle. By the way, selling your car is much easier if all the services have been done and records kept. Then again, some people don't mind throwing the dice when buying a used car... if the price is right.

Ian


--------------------
my ex - '05 Pulse stream green/black tridion cabrio, a/c (?), fanfare, CD changer, Loblaws beach towels (smiley serpents or smiley faces) on seats, "GOTSMART" plates, ordered Sept '04, delivered Feb '05, was under the care of Uncle Glenn and Liz and now CANMAN!

INSPIRED BY my smart, I'm going to lounge around in a white Fiat 500 for a while. It is just crazy enough.
And now, our Volt is here!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MightyMouseTech
post Sep 3 2009 - 10:14 AM
Post #8





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 1,558
Joined: Jun 21st, 07
From: Ottawa, Ontario
Member No.: 3,521



QUOTE (Fred J @ Sep 3 2009 - 01:17 PM) *
I would be more concerned by the frequency of the replacement.

Today's plugs last far longer than the Champion Plugs of old did.

I have a Suzuki V-6 with 196,000 on the original plugs and a Ford F150 with 100,000+ on them.

No indications so far that they need replacing.

Conservatively I wouldn't even think about the Smart ones for at least 100,00 - 150,000 kms.

If a plug eventually fouls up or misfires, it is not something that will let you down on the road, therefore if its not broken, don't fix it.

In due course a Tech's work station probably will have a box full of used, perfectly good plugs.

Just my opinion from some one who refuses to waste money needlessly.


I would not recommend following this advise. How long the plugs last depends mostly on what KIND of plugs the car uses. Copper plugs will typically only last 48k. Platinum and Iridium plugs can last up to 200k, but some vehicles require more frequent replacement. If you try and take the wrong plug past what it is designed for, you could be asking for trouble. A bad misfire due to a worn plug can quickly destroy a catalytic converter, or a worn plug with too large of a gap will damage ignition coils. A burned out cat can run in the thousands of dollars and would not be covered by warranty.

Just saying, be careful if you decide the engineers that designed the car are way to strict about certain maintenace items.

Note: I have seen a bad plug melt a catalytic converter down in as little as 20 mins of driving.

QUOTE (Fred J @ Sep 3 2009 - 01:17 PM) *
If a plug eventually fouls up or misfires, it is not something that will let you down on the road, therefore if its not broken, don't fix it.


Actually, yes it can let you down on the side of the road, and the repair could be in the thousands.

This post has been edited by MightyMouseTech: Sep 3 2009 - 10:19 AM


--------------------
Christopher "Mighty Mouse" C.

Life's too short to drink bad wine.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
shakey
post Sep 3 2009 - 10:20 AM
Post #9





Group: Regular Members
Posts: 123
Joined: Jul 2nd, 08
From: Cambridge
Member No.: 6,123



QUOTE (MightyMouseTech @ Sep 3 2009 - 10:14 AM) *
I would not recommend following this advise. How long the plugs last depends mostly on what KIND of plugs the car uses. Copper plugs will typically only last 48k. Platinum and Iridium plugs can last up to 200k, but some vehicles require more frequent replacement. If you try and take the wrong plug past what it is designed for, you could be asking for trouble. A bad misfire due to a worn plug can quickly destroy a catalytic converter, or a worn plug with too large of a gap will damage ignition coils. A burned out cat can run in the thousands of dollars and would not be covered by warranty.

Just saying, be careful if you decide the engineers that designed the car are way to strict about certain maintenace items.

Note: I have seen a bad plug melt a catalytic converter down in as little as 20 mins of driving.


Thanks for the advice, the plugs will be replaced smile.gif I don't want to take any chances on something really bad happening.

Shakey
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: Apr 18 2014 - 02:34 AM