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MikeT

My 404 Coupé Injection

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One of the hoses I hadn't managed to get a good replacement for up to today has finally been found - at Serie04. This is the one that connects the Hydrovac (brake booster) slave cylinder to the brake piping. An exact match, Made in France.

Hydrovac Hose.jpeg

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The Architects Garage did this one for me - my car as it might have looked in front of the Pininfarina factory in Torino in 1966.

Screen Shot 2021-04-24 at 11.50.06 AM.png

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The new master cylinder is installed along with the glass fluid reservoir I found yesterday. The brake line that takes fluid from the Hydrovac booster to the wheels is now connected to its hose (the new one I got last week) and it's bolted to the firewall.

Master cylinder and output line installed.jpeg

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Today I had some time to test clean the spare set of injector lines with Muriatic Acid to see if it's get more residue out. Boy did it ever! So I pumped about 100 mL of Muriatic Acid through each line of the pipes that had been on the engine with a large syringe, pulsing it back and forth. After the acid flush, they were purged with water, then acid flushed again, and again, until the solution coming out was not orange (rust) anymore. The water purges were at high pressure and that dislodged more particulates and fuel sludge which you can see in the green tray.
 
Following the acid/water purges, the lines were flushed first with WD40 to try and displace any remaining water - each line was done about 6 times until it ran clear. Then I used a syringe to punch about 70 mL of STP concentrated injection system cleaner through each line, letting it stay in there for a while. The final rinse was with MolySlip Combat spray. The lines inside, which previously - near the ends, and no doubt in between too - had visible black corrosion residue, are all clean now and a scriber inside will not find any loose stuff. The spare lines were also quickly cleaned.
 
Then I removed and cleaned the ends of the injectors and delivery valves that had been connected before to the injector lines (pre-final cleaning) and then reassembled it all. I also changed the steel clamp that holds the two lines for cylinders 1 and 2 (nearest firewall) to the intake plenum for an aluminum one I made, because the alignment was slightly off for the steel ones and it could have chewed into the line to injector 2 over time. The aluminum clamp I made is gently shaped and will cause no problems like that....
 
Finally, I got some rubber tubing for the radiator overflow and also derusted the two tiny steel clamps that hold the tube to the radiator. Then I painted them and installed the tubing.
 
So in terms of visible progress it was minimal but I am much more confident about the cleanliness of the injector lines now!Injector Lines mounted.jpegRad overflow.jpeg
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Photo of the flush and residue in the tube

Screen Shot 2021-05-08 at 9.20.27 PM.png

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With a few spare minutes left in a busy day I installed the radiator and connect the thermo-switch for the fan....and of course, installed the engine fan too.Radiator in.jpeg

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The 404 of my car's age has a funky-ass braking system: 280 mm diameter finned drums on the front wheels with over/under front shoes pushed by 4 pistons (1 on each end of each shoe so the front brakes have no self-servo effect) and 10 inch conventional rear drums.  To make up for the unusual front drums, there is a Hydrovac brake booster, which has a 7:1 assistance ratio (old school Mastervac is usually around 3:1) and because the displacements of brake applications are large, there is also a 5 litre external vacuum tank to supplement the vacuum in the Hydrovac unit itself.

 

Mine was bought NOS in 1993 and was installed in the car around 1998 and so it was in there with fluid for 18 years.  It may, in other words, need to be rebuilt.  However, in the interests of "wanting to know", I've installed it and I will determine how it is on a road test.  Meanwhile, my esteemed US colleague in Le Club 404, Todd Langton, has a 3.5 year old rebuilt unit ready in case I need it....

 

So the engine compartment looks like this (except there's a battery and the wiper motor is installed!), so it's pretty much time to reinstall the hood.

 

The remaining work:

  1. get the new lower rad hose as well as the new 75°C I ordered from Germany in mid-April.  I have a very good used lower hose and several old thermostats but I'd rather put a new one in
  2. all the fluids (gearbox, injection pump sump oil, brake fluid, coolant, engine oil, windshield washer fluid, ~20L of 94 octane no ethanol gas)
  3. verification of valve clearances (engine builder did it but I'll "trust, but verify")
  4. use the factory fuel injection tool kit to check the 5 main settings of the throttle body, etc.
  5. buy a new battery, check the electrics
  6. spin her up with plugs out to spread the oil around
  7. then try to start.

 

You can get an idea of the weird brake plumbing from this photo:Braking system 1.jpeg

 

It's looking mostly like a normal 404KF2 now

Engine with braking system in.jpeg

 

Vacuum tank above, Hydrovac below, from the (future) location of the battery. 

Hydrovac and vacuum tank.jpeg

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2 speed wiper motor installed - which does not leave a lot of room for draining new oil into the oil filler tube, hence the giraffe-style funnel.  Another advantage is the screen in the oil filler tube on the engine is not overwhelmed by the rate of drainage from the funnel so it's a "fill and forget" situation.

 

The accelerator cable on the fuel injected 404 has a brutally difficult-to-access fixing bolt.  Nothing that about an hour of pain would not rectify, mind you.Wiper motor installed.jpegThrottle Body Cable.jpegOil funnel.jpeg

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